Videos

  1. MSU Fisheries and Wildlife Program
  2. Bear Den Research - Fisheries & Wildlife Club assisting the Michigan DNR
  3. FW’s Burke Lake Banding Station
  4. Pioneering a new field: Macrosystems Ecology
  5. MSU Faculty conversations: Meredith Gore (Conservation Criminology)
  6. MSU Giant Panda habitat research
  7. MSU is helping to stop the spread of aquatic invasive species in Michigan
  8. How do tigers and people live side by side?
  9. Electrofishing for Largemouth Bass
  10. Sea Lampreys and Dam Removals in Lake Michigan Rivers
  11. Project FISH

MSU Fisheries and Wildlife Program

Bear Den Research
Fisheries & Wildlife Club assisting the Michigan DNR

FW’s Burke Lake Banding Station

Pioneering a new field: Macrosystems Ecology

 

MSU Faculty conversations: Meredith Gore

MSU Giant Panda habitat research

MSU is helping to stop the spread of aquatic invasive species in Michigan

How do tigers and people live side by side?

Electrofishing for Largemouth Bass

Sea Lampreys and Dam Removals in Lake Michigan Rivers

Project FISH

 

Graduate Student Organization

What is the GSO?

The Graduate Student Organization (GSO) is an assemblage of graduate students in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife.  The goal of the organization is to create an interactive community of like-minded individuals and plan events of interest. Previous events planned by the organization include the annual research symposium, biweekly seminar series, department-wide spring picnic, intramural sports teams and a weekly happy hour hosted by the Friday Afternoon Refreshment Team (FART). GSO also supports travel grants to its members for presenting and attending professional meetings and conferences. 

To find out more about Graduation Student Organization within the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife click on the link: http://www.gso.fw.msu.edu/

Additional Information

Additional information about the Rachana Rajendra Neotropical Migrant Bird Sanctuary is available through the MSU Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. Feel free to contact us via fax or e-mail 24 hours a day, or call during our normal business hours, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (EST/EDT) Monday through Friday.

Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
Michigan State University
480 Wilson Rd. Room 13
Natural Resources Bldg.
East Lansing, MI 48824-1222
Phone: 517-355-4478
Fax: 517-432-1699
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Award Recipients/Essay Winners

Award Recipients

''
Pictured: Dr. William W. Taylor, Past-Chair FW, Laura Riley,
Alyson McHugh, Dr. Kunwar Rajendra, and Nathan Pfost

 

        2000 - Lisa Herder

        2001 - Laura R. Riley

        2002 - Laura R. Riley

        2003 - Nathan Pfost

        2004 - Alyson McHugh

        2005 - Valerie Alzner

        2006 - Michelle Rosen

        2007 - Andrew Myers

        2008 - Lauren Scopel

 

Essay Award Winners

Since the creation of FW101L (Introduction to Fisheries and Wildlife Lab) in 2008, students in this class have had their initial outdoor laboratory experience in the Rachana Rajendra Neotropical Migrant Bird Sanctuary.

This is an eye-opening experience for many of them who are unfamiliar with the Sanctuary and the flora and fauna it sustains. At the end of their class experience, the students are asked to write a reflective essay, and many of them have written about the value of their experience visiting the Sanctuary.

They often express how they love that we have such a place at MSU, and how this helps them get closer to nature. The Rajendra Essay Award was established in 2012 to recognize students who choose to focus their reflective essay on the topic of “sanctuary,” specifically connecting this concept to their time in the Rachana Rajendra Neotropical Migrant Bird Sanctuary, and to the life of Rachana Rajendra.

2012 Essay Winner: Antonio Martinez

2013 Essay Winners: Nick Everett and Sam Brill

2014 Essay Winners: Danielle Blumstein and Frances Thompson

 




About the Endowment

Rachana Rajendra Neotropical Migrant Bird Sanctuary Endowment

The RRNMBS Endowment Fund was established to encourage education, training, and research in the area of neotropical migrant birds. Dr. and Mrs. Rajendra, along with family and friends, established this endowment in memory of Rachana, to share her love of birds with others. Rachana, who died tragically in an automobile accident in 1997, was a graduate of the University of Michigan College of Engineering.

How Funds from the Endowment are Used

This endowment was established to provide funding for Fisheries and Wildlife students who are interested in avian species; to develop maps and educational materials on neotropical migrant  birds in Baker Woodlot/Rachana Rajendra Neotropical Migrant Bird Sanctuary (RRNMBS) at Michigan State University; to provide scholarships (see below) and research funds for Fisheries and Wildlife students conducting avian studies and programs and to improve trails, entrances, and educational signs at Baker Woodlot/RRNMBS.

Undergraduate Award

Beginning in 1999 until 2008, an undergraduate scholarship was awarded in Rachana Rajendra’s name to honor students with a keen interest in avian conservation. The award was presented yearly, each spring, at the Michigan State University College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Undergraduate Awards Banquet. Recipients of the award received a $1000 scholarship and have their name engraved on a plaque that is on display in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Undergraduate Advising Center (Room 40 Natural Resources Building).

Make a donation!

A11107

   For more information or to learn how to make a contribution, contact:

    Department of Fisheries and Wildlife

        Chairperson
        Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
        Michigan State University
        480 Wilson Rd., Room 13
        Natural Resources Bldg.
        East Lansing, MI 48824-1222
        Phone: 517-355-4478
        Fax: 517-432-1699
        .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    OR

  University Development Office

     Office of Development
        East Lansing, MI  48824-1005
        Phone: 517-884-1000 or 1-800-232-4678
        .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

History of the Sanctuary

''

History of Baker Woodlot / Rachana Rajendra Neotropical Migrant Bird Sanctuary

The documented history of Baker Woodlot / Rachana Rajendra Neotropical Migrant Bird Sanctuary (RRNMBS) begins with the foundation of Michigan State College in 1855. At that time, the college’s landholdings were comprised mainly of dense forest (Crozier 1896). By the turn of the century, virtually all areas on campus had been cleared of trees except for two tracts of land (Smith 1897). These tracts later became known as Sanford Natural Area and Baker Woodlot. In 1894, the State Board of Agriculture resolved that these areas be preserved to demonstrate the proper techniques for managing woodlands t produce “continuous lasting profits.” (Crozier 1896).

In November 1902, control of Baker Woodlot (approximately 78 acres) as well as Sanford Natural Area was transferred to the Department of Forestry (Bogue 1903), which holds jurisdiction over them today. In 1941 Baker Woodlot, which had originally been called South Woodlot, received its name to honor two brothers who attended the university, James Fred Baker and Henry Lee Baker (Beach and Stevens 1979). One June 5, 1999, Baker Woodlot was co-designated RRNMBS in honor of Rachana Rajendra. Ms. Rajendra was an avid bird lover who was tragically killed in a car accident in 1997. To honor her memory, the Rajendra family and friends established an endowment in her name.

Baker Woodlot / RRNMBS serves as the MSU community and friends as a place to learn, explore and reflect.

Vegetation History

Since 1902 several cutting and planting episodes have taken place within the woodlot. In 1903, improvement cuttings described as the removal of over mature trees were made and replaced with black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia), bitternut hickory (Carya cordiforis), and basswood (Tilia americana). From 1906 to 1909 several fires occurred within the woodlot. Black locust, chestnut (Castanea dentata) and white ash (Fraxinus americana) were planted soon thereafter. In 1935, R. H. Westveld of the Forestry Department selected two small plots in the north-central part of the woodlot for experimentation. One was clear cut and the other selectively cut for the purpose of comparing the growth rate between trees in each section. General improvement cuttings also took place in 1938 and 1947 to remove over mature trees. Records are not clear as the extent of precise location of these cuttings and plantings (Beach and Stevens 1979).

The southern edge of the woodlot was used as a nursery around the turn of the century for black locust and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa). The northwest corner was also used for this purpose; planted with alternating rows of eastern black walnut (Juglans nigra) and northern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis) in 1910. All the northern white cedar have been removed since this time, with the exception of one remaining tree (Beach and Stevens 1979).

Baker Woodlot / RRNMBS is one of eight areas on the Michigan State University campus with a Category I natural area designation (http://www.cpa.msu.edu/beal/nat_areas/namap.htm). Category 1 natural areas are areas managed at the highest level of protection and lowest level of usage.

Literature Cited

Beach, J. H., and W. D. Stevens. 1979. A study of Baker Woodlot. I. Physical and historical description. Michigan Botanist. 18:126-136.

Bogue, E. E. 1903. Report of the Forestry Department. Annual Report State Board of Agriculture. 41:42-46.

Crozier, A. A. 1896. The college woodlots. MAC Record. 1:1.

Smith, C. D. 1897. Report of the Department of Practical Agriculture. Annual Report Secretary of State Board of Agriculture Michigan. 34:33-40.

Where’s the Sanctuary

''

How to get to the Sanctuary

Baker Woodlot and Rachana Rajendra Neotropical Bird Sanctuary (RRNMBS) is located in the south-central section of the main Michigan State University campus. It is bordered to the north by Service Road, to the west by Farm Lane, to the east by Bogue Street and to the south by the C & O Railroad. The MSU Clinical Center is located immediately east of the Sanctuary.

There are three entrances to the Sanctuary.  Two can be found evenly spaced along the east fence on Bogue Street and one entrance on Farm Lane: near the northwest corner.  A bike rack is located at each entrance; bikers are encouraged to leave their bicycles secured to the rack before entering the Sanctuary as bikes are not allowed within the enclosed area. Vehicle parking is most readily available on Bogue Street.

Map

Visitors traveling from outside the East Lansing area may obtain driving direction by visiting: http://maps.msu.edu/drivingdirections.html. Maps of the MSU campus can be readily accessed at http://maps.msu.edu/.  Baker Woodlot/RRNMBS can be found at http://maps.msu.edu/interactive/index.php?location=NLID.

Trail Map

There are several trails within the Sanctuary providing visitors with opportunities to view the diversity and abundance of life throughout the area. A trail map may be accessed at: http://www.cpa.msu.edu/nat_area/baker.htm.

Bird List

  1. American Crow
  2. American Goldfinch
  3. American Redstart
  4. American Robin
  5. Baltimore Oriole    
  6. Bay-breasted Warbler
  7. Black-and-White Warbler
  8. Blackburnian Warbler
  9. Black-capped Chickadee
  10. Black-throated Blue Warbler
  11. Black-throated Green Warbler
  12. Blue Jay
  13. Brown-headed Cowbird
  14. Cedar Waxwing
  15. Chipping Sparrow
  16. Common Grackle
  17. Common Yellowthroat
  18. Downy Woodpecker
  19. Eastern Wood Pewee
  20. Fox Sparrow
  21. Gray Catbird
  22. Great Horned Owl
  23. Great Blue Heron    
  24. House Wren    
  25. Least Flycatcher
  26. Magnolia Warbler
  27. Mallard
  28. Nashville Warbler
  29. Northern Cardinal
  30. Northern Parula
  31. Ovenbird
  32. Red-bellied Woodpecker
  33. Red-eyed Vireo
  34. Red-tailed Hawk
  35. Red-winged Blackbird
  36. Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  37. Scarlet Tanager
  38. Song Sparrow
  39. Swainson’s Thrush
  40. Tennessee Warbler
  41. Tufted Titmouse
  42. Veery
  43. White-breasted Nuthatch
  44. White-throated Sparrow
  45. Wood Duck
  46. Wood Thrush
  47. Yellow-rumped Warbler

 

About Rachana

Rachana Rajendra

''

June 10, 1969 - January 6, 1997

Rachana was a vibrant, beautiful young lady whose desire to experience life to its fullest reached out to engulf and inspire those in her path. The word Rachana, in the Sanskrit language, means creation and Rachana was truly a creation of sweetness and love.

Rachana was born in the Rajendra Hospital (the name is a coincidence), Patiala, Punjab in India and was nicknamed ‘Munia,’ meaning a young and sweet girl. When she was three years old, she came to the U.S. with her parents, Dr. Kunwar Rajendra and Shanno, who have been residents of East Lansing ever since. She loved birds, flowers and nature very much and made others in her life a priority for her time and attention. She had pet birds from childhood onward, and even tried to take a parakeet for a walk in the neighborhood!

Rachana was a 1987 graduate of Okemos High School, where she was an active athlete in Varsity gymnastics, soccer and swimming. While attending the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, she established herself as a leader of strong character, serving as a teaching assistant, an orientation leader, and a member of the Michigan Student Assembly. In 1992, Rachana graduated from the University of Michigan with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. After graduation, she extended her volunteer efforts to embrace community activities such as reading to the blind and volunteering at soup kitchens. She was employed by GTE in Raleigh, North Carolina, in the field of Radio Frequency Engineering, and had earned the Engineer-in-Training designation leading to Professional Engineer license certification. Her excellence in engineering was recognized by GTE, which honored her with five teamwork and quality awards.

Dedicated to living life to the fullest, Rachana was an avid sportswoman, a great skier, snow-boarder, hiker and tri-athlete. She was also an accomplished classical Indian dancer, graduating to a professional status in Bharat Natyam in May 1984. Rachana, along with her two sisters, Archana and Anuja, performed Indian dances as the Rajendra Sisters Dance Troupe in the United States, Canada, and India.

After spending a truly memorable Christmas and New Year at home with her family, including the visiting grandmother from India, she left by car for her job in Raleigh accompanied by her most favorite friend, a beautiful bird nicknamed Mango. In fact, she decided to drive home from North Carolina for the first time, because she was anxious to share Mango with everyone at home and the airline could not accommodate the bird cage due to some last minute changes in their plans. She would not make it back to Raleigh, nor would Mango. An automobile accident in North Carolina tragically took Rachana’s life.

Rachana’s family and friends wanted to continue to share her love of birds, nature and people with the rest of the world. Thus, the idea of The Rachana Rajendra Neo-tropical Migrant Bird Sanctuary was born. Inspired by Rachana’s creativity, energy, and determination, in December, 1998, her family also opened Moon-Baked Creations Art Lounge and Cafe in Okemos, which continues to operate under new ownership.

Rachana was an incredible gift to all who knew her or came in contact with her ù with her effervescent smile, humor and grace! In her brief moments on Earth, she captured the essence of what a stroll in the Rachana Rajendra Neotropical Migrant Bird Sanctuary at Michigan State University would be. She often wished:

” When I grow up, I want to have two dogs, a bird, a house, and read books under a tree.”

Rachana Rajendra Bird Sanctuary

Rachana Rajendra

Heaven’s Flyers
Some say they don’t believe
That Angels can be seen or heard.
What a shame such blindness
What a pity such deafness
When the Song of Songs abounds…
And Heaven’s flyers are all around…
Only thinly disguised ... as birds.
-Anonymous

 

The Baker Woodlot and Rachana Rajendra Neotropical Migrant Bird Sanctuary is a 78-acre natural area located on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. It was dedicated in June 1999 to honor the memory of Rachana Rajendra, an Okemos resident who was killed in a car accident. Ms. Rajendra was a lover of birds and nature. An endowment was established by her family in her name to provide funding for a scholarship and avian research in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at MSU and to enhance and promote the use and enjoyment of the sanctuary.

Burke Lake Banding Station

Help us connect people of all ages with birds!

In 2010 we began mist netting and banding birds at Rose Lake State Wildlife Research Area in Bath, Michigan. After a few seasons, we realized that we had found a special place with high bird diversity, especially during fall migration when many birds stopover to rest and refuel for their journey south. During the last two years we operated our full array of nets, and captured over 6000 individuals of 90 species. We also saw that we were providing a unique outreach and education opportunity for the mid-Michigan community. In the last two years we had approximately 400 visitors of all ages, including young kids, university students and classes, highschool students, and retired bird enthusiasts.

Our goal is to begin an established, non-profit, bird banding station that will provide opportunities for research, education and training of students of all ages, and outreach to the broader mid-Michigan community. To achieve our goal, we have begun raising funds to support the short and long term operation of the banding site.

Our highest priority right now is to raise funds to support our fall migration field season. Consider a gift today! Contributions to the Burke Lake Banding Station may be made through the Crowdpower site at MSU, linked here: http://givingto.msu.edu/crowdpower/burke-lake-bird-banding-station.cfm.

We have currently raised $10,000 of the $15,000 needed for operation. Over 90% of the contributed funds will go toward paying for seasonal field staff, many of whom are current undergraduate students or recent graduates of Michigan State University. The remaining funds help replace mist nets and other banding supplies. Our goal, for this campaign is to raise $5,000.


With your support we will be able to (1) collect long-term data on the health of the landbird community of the Rose Lake State Wildlife Research Area during breeding and migratory seasons, (2) provide university students the opportunity to be active participants in ongoing research and learn skills associated with capturing and handling of wild birds, (3) engage with children of all ages with hands-on activities in a science-related discipline, and (4) provide a unique opportunity for bird enthusiasts in the Great Lakes region on state-managed land.

SPECIFIC OUTREACH AND EDUCATION GOALS:

  1. Provide hands-on training for our future wildlife professionals, by teaching them how to capture and handle wild birds. Depending on the status of the on-going research there may be additional training in banding birds, collecting blood and tissue samples, examining birds for ticks, radio telemetry, and habitat sampling.
  2. Host field trips for university classes that provide not only exposure to techniques used in avian-based research, but more importantly, show them how those techniques are being applied for ongoing research projects; a component frequently missing from many college courses.
  3. Work with instructors and kids from K-12 schools, summer camps, 4-H groups, and others to provide an opportunity to connect with nature through hands-on activities, creating enthusiasm and appreciation for our natural resources and the intrinsic value of wildlife.
  4. Connect with a growing community of bird enthusiasts to enhance appreciation for and visibility of state-owned lands beyond the traditional, consumptive uses (i.e. hunting and fishing).
  5. Provide a venue for community building and the exchange of local, historical, and scientific knowledge.


Please help us spread the word!  If you know anyone that is passionate about birds and about educating the next generation of bird-enthusiasts, please tell them about Burke Lake Banding Station!

Save Our Polar Bear

MSU Natural Resources Building Polar Bear

Do you know our polar bear?

By Darrin McCullough

In the 1950’s, the pursuit and harvest of polar bear Ursus maritimas was a legal and prized hunting opportunity on the frigid northern coast of Alaska. Polar bears were numerous with sizable populations throughout the arctic and Alaskan policymakers allowed for their harvest by non-indigenous people with proper licensing. During this time, Mr. Koepplinger from Oak Park, Michigan successfully harvested a massive polar bear near Point Barrow, Alaska, eventually donating the full body mount to the Michigan State University Museum. In 1966, Dr. Howard Tanner accepted this specimen from the museum to place in the lobby of the newly opened Natural Resources Building. Nearly half a century later, our polar bear continues to stand at his post and greet new students of natural resource management while acting as a notable landmark, an honor guard and a stoic reminder of our past successes and future challenges we all face as stewards of our one global environment.

Throughout my undergraduate and graduate student experience in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, I continue to meet fellow Spartan professionals who fondly reminisce about their time under the soul seeking gaze of our polar mascot. We all remember those late nights and early mornings with the ever-present bear standing his post to greet us, wish us luck on that final exam, and bid us farewell as we venture out into an uncertain future as natural resource professionals. Through these shared memories, including frantic preparation for another brutal exam with equally frantic classmates in the Polar Bear Room, sharing amusing anecdotes of ill-considered undergraduate activities, and hearing legendary tales of mischievous graduate students assisting the bear in a migration to the third floor office of their advisor, the bear has become a significant part of who we are as FW students. One can only imagine the professor’s surprise as he was greeted by the nine foot tall predator lurking in his office. Though our bear was successfully returned to his station without damage, the years since then have not been easy on our friend and time has taken its toll on this prominent icon.

Whether you wish to call it a symbol, a mascot, an icon, or a long standing tradition, our bear has tirelessly witnessed our societal triumphs and failures in the conservation of our natural resources and needs our help to be restored. The current estimate to refurbish our friend to pristine condition is $6000, and while this may seem like a lot, as you all know, Spartans will. So that he may continue this honorable tradition, I ask you, my fellow Spartans from across our one earth to come together, pay it forward, and contribute to the Polar Bear Restoration Fund. If we simply join our forces and unite as the one family we are, we can easily remove the uncertain future of this one polar bear and perhaps assist future generations of Spartan conservationists to know the great Ursus maritimas.

Contributions to the Polar Bear Restoration Fund may be made through the Crowdpower site at MSU, linked here: http://givingto.msu.edu/crowdpower/polar-bear.cfm.  All donated funds will go to the restoration of our bear with excess funds used to support student organizations, teaching, and research within the department.

Preveterinary

This concentration meets the minimum requirements established by MSU for admission to the MSU College of Veterinary Medicine.  Students selecting this concentration should also meet with the College of Veterinary Medicine preveterinary adviser.

Complete ALL of the following courses (28 cr.) 

BMB 401

Basic Biochemistry

4

CEM 251

Organic Chemistry I

3

CEM 252

Organic Chemistry II

3

CEM 255

Organic Chemistry Lab

2

FW 423

Principles of Fish & Wildlife Disease

3

FW 423L

Principles of Fish & Wildlife Disease Lab

1

FW 463

Wildlife Disease Ecology

3

MMG 301

Introductory Microbiology

3

MMG 302

Introductory Microbiology Labratory

1

PHY 232

Introductory Physics II

3

PHY 251

Introductory Physics Lab I

1

PHY 252

Introductory Physics Lab II

1

 

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3-4 cr.)

ANS 405

Endocrinology of Reproduction

4

ANS 409

Advancement of Reproduction

3

MMG 409

Eukaryotic Cell Biology

3

MMG 451

Immunology

3

PSL 310

Physiology for Pre-Health Professionals

4

ZOL 402

Neurobiology

3

ZOL 408

Histology

4

ZOL 425

Cells & Development

4

ZOL 450

Cancer Biology

3

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (4 cr.)

ANS 314

Genetic Improvement of Domestic Animals

4

ZOL 341

Fundamental Genetics

4

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3-4 cr.)

ANS 313

Principles of Animal Feeding & Nutrition

4

HNF 150

Introduction to Human Nutrition

3

HNF 360

Principles of Human Nutrition

3

Electives:   Complete the necessary number of elective credits needed to reach the required 120 credit minimum (123 credits if you were required to complete MTH 1825) for graduation.  

Fish and Wildlife Disease Ecology and Management

Complete ALL of the following courses (24 cr.)

MMG 301

Introductory Microbiology

3

FW 423

Principles of Fish & Wildlife Disease

3

FW 423L

Principles of Fish & Wildlife Disease Lab

1

FW 444

Conservation Biology

3

FW 463

Wildlife Disease Ecology

3

ZOL 341

Fundemental Genetics

4

ZOL 445

Evolution

3

EPI 390

Disease in Society

4

 

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3-4 cr.)

CEM 143

Survey of Organic Chemistry

4

CEM 251

Organic Chemistry I

3

 

 

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3 cr.)

FW 410

Upland Ecosystem Management

3

FW 414

Aquatic Ecosystem Management

3

FW 416

Marine Ecosystem Management

3

FW 417

Wetland Ecology & Management

3

FW 454

Environmental Hydrology & Watershed Management

3

FW 479

Fisheries Management

3

 

 

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3-4 cr.)

FW 471

Ichthyology

4

ZOL 306

Invertebrate Biology

4

ZOL 316

General Parasitology

3

ZOL 360

Biology of Birds

4

ZOL 365

Biology of Mammals

4

ZOL 384

Biology of Reptiles & Amphibians

4

Electives:   Complete the necessary number of elective credits needed to reach the required 120 credit minimum (123 credits if you were required to complete MTH 1825) forgraduation.  

Water Sciences

Complete TWO of the following courses (6 cr.)

FW 472

Limnology

3

FW 420

Stream Ecology

3

FW 417

Wetland Ecology & Management

3

 

 

Complete the following course (3 cr.)

FW 474

Field & Lab Techniques for Aquatic Studies

3

 

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3 cr.)

FW 414

Aquatic Ecosystem Management

3

FW 416

Marine Ecosystem Management

3

FW 454

Environmental Hydrology & Watershed Management

3

FW 479

Fisheries Management

3

 

 

Complete ONE of the followoing courses (3-4 cr.)

ENT 404

Fundamentals of Entomology

3

ENT 422

Aquatic Entomology

3

FW 471

Ichthyology

4

ZOL 306

Invertebrate Biology

4

 

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3-4 cr.)

PLB 418

Plant Systematics

3

PLB 424

Algal Biology

4

 

 

Complete TWO of the following courses (6-8 cr.)

CSS 350

Introduction to Plant Genetics

3

FW 431

Ecophysiology & Toxicology of Fishes

3

GLG 421

Environmental Geochemistry

4

MMG 425

Microbial Ecology

3

ZOL 303

Oceanography

4

ZOL 341

Fundamental Genetics

4

ZOL 353

Marine Biology

4

ZOL 483

Environmental Physiology

4

Electives:   Complete the necessary number of elective credits needed to reach the required 120 credit minimum (123 credits if you were required to complete MTH 1825) for graduation.  

 

Fisheries Biology and Management

Complete ALL of the following courses (10 cr.)

FW 471

Ichthyology

4

FW 474

Field & Lab Techniques for Aquatic Studies

3

FW 479

Fisheries Management

3

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3 cr.)

FW 420

Stream Ecology

3

FW 472

Limnology

3

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3 cr.)

FW 414

Aquatic Ecosystem Management

3

FW 416

Marine Ecosystem Management

3

FW 417

Wetland Ecology & Management

3

FW 454

Environmental Hydrology & Watershed Management

3

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3-4 cr.)

ENT 422

Aquatic Entomology

3

ZOL 306

Invertebrate Biology

4

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3 cr.)

PLB 418

Plant Systematics

3

PLB 424

Algal Biology

4

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3-4 cr.)

CSS 350

Introduction to Plant Genetics

3

FW 431

Ecophysiology & Toxicology of Fishes

3

ZOL 328

Comparative Anatomy & Biology of Vertebrates

4

ZOL 341

Fundemental Genetics

4

ZOL 483

Environmental Physiology

4

Electives:   Complete the necessary number of elective credits needed to reach the required 120 credit minimum (123 credits if you were required to complete MTH 1825) for graduation.  

Wildlife Biology and Management

Complete ALL of the following courses (9 cr.)

FW 410

Upland Ecosystem Management

3

FW 417

Wetland Ecology & Management

3

FW 413

Wildlife Research & Management Techniques

3

 

Complete TWO of the following courses (8 cr.)

ZOL 360

Biology of Birds

4

ZOL 365

Biology of Mammals

4

ZOL 384

Biology of Reptiles & Amphibians

4

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3 cr.)

FOR 204

Forest Vegetation

3

PLB 218

Plants of Michigan

3

PLB 418

Plant Systematics

3

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3 cr.)

PLB 105

Plant Biology

3

PLB 203

Biology of Plants

3

PLB 335

Plants through Time

3

PLB 441

Plant Ecology

3

FOR 404

Forest Ecology

3

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3-4 cr.)

CSS 350

Introduction to Plant Genetics

3

ZOL 328

Comparative Anatomy & Biology of Vertebrates

4

ZOL 341

Fundemental Genetics

4

ZOL 483

Environmental Physiology

4

Electives:   Complete the necessary number of elective credits needed to reach the required 120 credit minimum (123 credits if you were required to complete MTH 1825) for graduation. 

 

Conservation Biology

Complete ALL of the following courses (12 cr.)

FW 443

Restoration Ecology

3

FW 444

Conservation Biology

3

FW 445

Socio-economics & Policy of Conservation Biology

3

ZOL 445

Evolution

3

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3 cr.)

PLB 441

Plant Ecology

3

FOR 404

Forest Ecology

3

ZOL 485

Tropical Biology

3

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3-4 cr.)

CSS 350

Introduction to Plant Genetics

3

ZOL 341

Fundemental Genetics

4

 

Complete ONE of the following Courses (3 cr.)

FW410

Upland Ecosystem Management

3

FW 414

Aquatic Ecosystem Management

3

FW 416

Marine Ecosystem Management

3

FW 417

Wetland Ecosystem Management

3

FW 454

Environmental Hydrology & Watershed Management

3

FW 479

Fisheries Management

3

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3-4 cr.)

EEP 225

Ecological Economics

3

CSUS 464

Environmental & Natural Resources Policy in MI

3

CSUS 465

Environmental Law & Policy

3

FOR 462

Forest Resource Economics & Management

4

FOR 466

Natural Resources Policy

3

FW 481

Global Issues in Fisheries & Wildlife

3

MC 450

International Environmental Law & Policy

3

ZOL 446

Environmental Issues & Public Policy

3

 

Complete ONE of the following courses (3-4 cr.)

ENT 404

Fundementals of Entomology

3

ENT 422

Aquatic Entomology

3

FOR 204

Forest Vegetation

3

FW 471

Ichthyology

4

PLB 218

Plants of Michigan

3

PLB 418

Plant Systematics

3

ZOL 360

Biology of Birds

4

ZOL 365

Biology of Mammals

4

ZOL 384

Biology of Reptiles & Amphibians

4

Electives:   Complete the necessary number of elective credits needed to reach the required 120 credit minimum (123 credits if you were required to complete MTH 1825) for graduation.  

Forms

Timesheet

Pre-Trip Authorization/Travel Expense Worksheet 9/15

Non-Travel Reimbursement Instructions

Non-Travel Reimbursement Worksheet

Cash Advance Form

Travel Research Participant Cash Advances

FW Graduate Program Forms

Exposure Outreach CompleteExposure Outreach Complete

FW Graduate Placement InformationFW Graduate Placement Information

FW Grad Evaluation FormFW Grad Evaluation Form

MS Program of Study Form  / MS Program of Study Form

Student Reference Request

 

 

Post Doctorial Researchers and Specialists

Graduate Students

Adjunct Faculty

Faculty

Support Staff

Biometry and Modeling

  • James Bence
  • Travis Brenden
  • Daniel Hayes
  • Michael Jones
  • Jack Liu
  • Brian Maurer
  • Robert Montgomery
  • Cheryl Murphy
  • Scott Peacor
  • Brian Roth
  • Juan Steibel
  • Jean Tsao
  • David Williams
  • Scott Winterstein
  • Pheobe Zarnetske

 

 

Updated: 10 August 2015.

Natural Resource Disease and Health

  • Erin Dreelin
  • Mohamed Faisal (Fish and Wildlife Disease Conservation Medicine Research Group)
  • Meredith Gore
  • Cheryl Murphy
  • Jen Owen (Fish and Wildlife Disease Conservation Medicine Research Group)
  • Joan Rose
  • Jean Tsao (Fish and Wildlife Disease Conservation Medicine Research Group)

 

 

Updated: 10 August 2015.

Ecological Genetics and Physiology

  • Weiming Li
  • Cheryl Murphy
  • Jen Owen
  • Orlando Sarnelle
  • Kim Scribner
  • Juan Steibel

 

 

Updated: 10 August 2015.

Human Dimension and Policy

  • Mark Axelrod
  • Jordan Burroughs
  • Ken Frank
  • Carole Gibbs
  • Meredith Gore
  • Michael Jones
  • Dan Kramer
  • Jo Latimore
  • Frank Lupi
  • Shawn Riley
  • Bill Taylor
  • Heather Triezenberg

 

 

Updated: 10 August 2015.

Ecological Sustainability and Landscape Ecology

  • Rique Campa
  • Kendra Cheruvelil
  • Erin Dreelin
  • Dana Infante
  • Dan Kramer
  • Jack Liu
  • Brian Maurer
  • Robert Montgomery
  • Gary Roloff
  • Pat Soranno
  • Bill Taylor
  • Andres Vina
  • David Williams
  • Pheobe Zarnetske

 

 

Updated: 11 August 2015.

Landscape Limnology

 

 

Updated: 10 August 2015.

Aquatic Ecology and Management

  • James Bence
  • Mary Bremigan
  • Kendra Cheruvelil
  • Meredith Gore
  • Dan Hayes
  • Dana Infante
  • Michael Jones
  • Dan Kramer
  • Jo Latimore
  • Scott Peacor
  • Brian Roth
  • Joan Rose
  • Orlando Sarnelle
  • Pat Soranno
  • Bill Taylor
  • Michael Wagner
  • Lois Wolfson

 

 

Updated: 10 August 2015.

Wildlife Ecology and Management

  • Mark Axelrod
  • Rique Campa
  • Meredith Gore
  • Dan Kramer
  • Jack Liu
  • Brian Maurer
  • Robert Montgomery
  • Jen Owen
  • Shawn Riley
  • Gary Roloff
  • Kim Scribner
  • Heather Triezenberg
  • Jean Tsao
  • Andres Vina
  • David Williams
  • Scott Winterstein

 

 

Updated: 11 August 2015.

Fisheries Ecology and Management

  • Mark Axelrod
  • James Bence
  • Mary Bremigan
  • Travis Brenden
  • Meredith Gore
  • Daniel Hayes
  • Dana Infante
  • Michael Jones
  • Cheryl Murphy
  • Amber Peters
  • Brian Roth
  • Kim Scribner
  • Bill Taylor
  • Heather Triezenberg
  • Jean Tsao
  • Michael Wagner

 

 

Updated: 10 August 2015.

FW Positions at MSU

The following positions within the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife are currently OPEN:

For a complete listing of all available employment opportunities within Michigan State University, you should refer to the MSU Applicant Page (MAP).

MSU Employment Services

FW Email Job Boards

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife presently maintains 2 email employment bulletin boards: FWJOBS & FWGRADJOBS.

FWJOBS posts temporary, seasonal, and permanent employment, as well as Masters-level graduate assistantships, for those working towards or have recently received a fisheries, wildlife, ecological, environmental, or natural resources type bachelor’s (B.S.) degree.

FWGRADJOBS posts employment and graduate opportunities for those that are in the process of getting or have already acquired an M.S. or Ph.D. in fisheries, wildlife, ecological, environmental, or natural resources type degree.

FWJOBS and FWGRADJOBS are open to anyone looking for fisheries or wildlife employment, not just MSU students and alumni.

To subscribe or unsubscribe to FWJOBS or FWGRADJOBS go to:

FWJOBS: http://list.msu.edu/archives/fwjobs.html

FWGRADJOBS: http://list.msu.edu/archives/fwgradjobs.html

 

WANT ALL THE JOB ANNOUNCEMENTS
WITHOUT ALL THE EMAILS?

If you want all the job announcements without ALL the emails, you can either subscribe to the DIGEST version of the listservs. With the digest version, you’ll receive one email a day with the job announcements that were sent that day. Follow the subscribing instructions above, but select “Digest (traditional” as your subscription type.

OR

You just view the job announcements using the listservs archive sites (same URLs as above). Just click on the date and week, and you’ll be able to see all the job announcements posted to the listservs.

If you know of a job announcement that you think others would benefit from hearing about, send the announcement to Jim Schneider (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address))

FW Graduate Programs

CONSIDERING GOING TO GRADUATE SCHOOL?

  • The National Association of University Fisheries and Wildlife Programs maintains an extensive listing of Universities that offer graduate degrees related to fisheries and wildlife.

  • The Wildlife Society maintains a listing of all college and universities in the United States and Canada that offer graduate programs in wildlife conservation and management.

  • The American Fisheries Society also posts a listing of Fisheries-Related Programs at North American Colleges and Universities.

  • The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife presently maintains 2 email employment bulletin boards: FWJOBS & FWGRADJOBS.

    FWJOBS posts temporary, seasonal, and permanent employment, as well as Masters-level graduate assistantships, for those working towards or have recently received a fisheries, wildlife, ecological, environmental, or natural resources type bachelor’s (B.S.) degree.

    FWGRADJOBSposts employment and graduate opportunities for those that are in the process of getting or have already acquired an M.S. or Ph.D. in fisheries, wildlife, ecological, environmental, or natural resources type degree.

    FWJOBS and FWGRADJOBS are open to anyone looking for fisheries or wildlife employment, not just MSU students and alumni.

  • Announcements for Graduate Assistantships in fisheries and wildlife can also be found at the following locations:

Non-Profit Organizations

Federal Natural Resource Agencies

Temporary, summer and permanent employment announcements, employment information and application materials for ALL federal agencies can be found at the following site: USAJOBS

State Employment Sites

America’s Job Bank
Alabama
Alaska
Arkansas
Arizona
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas

Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina

North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

State Natural Resource Agencies

ALABAMA

ALASKA

ARIZONA

ARKANSAS

CALIFORNIA

COLORADO

CONNECTICUT

DELAWARE

FLORIDA

GEORGIA

HAWAII

IDAHO

ILLINOIS

INDIANA

IOWA

KANSAS

KENTUCKY

LOUISIANA

MAINE

MARYLAND

MASSACHUSETTS

MICHIGAN

MINNESOTA

MISSOURI

MISSISSIPPI

MONTANA

NEBRASKA

NEVADA

NEW HAMPSHIRE

NEW JERSEY

NEW MEXICO

NEW YORK

NORTH CAROLINA

NORTH DAKOTA

OHIO

OKLAHOMA

OREGON

PENNSYLVANIA

RHODE ISLAND

SOUTH CAROLINA

SOUTH DAKOTA

TENNESSEE

TEXAS

UTAH

VERMONT

VIRGINIA

WASHINGTON

WEST VIRGINIA

WISCONSIN

WYOMING

FW Employment Websites

THIS IS A GREAT PLACE TO START!

 

BROWSE THROUGH THESE OTHER FW EMPLOYMENT SITES

AQUATIC & FISHERIES

OCEANOGRAPHY / MARINE SCIENCE / MARINE BIOLOGY

WILDLIFE / TERRESTRIAL SITES

OTHER NATURAL RESOURCE / ENVIRONMENTAL SITES

Boone and Crockett Program and Affiliated Enterprises

Michigan State University (MSU) is recognized around the world as a top research university focusing on solving problems in Michigan, the United States and around the world. MSU offers highly ranked and recognized academic and service-learning programs that truly engage with society to facilitate the abilities of future leaders who strive to enhance the well-being of all people and their quality of the life.  As such MSU is committed to conservation of our natural resources that contribute to the economy, food sustenance, recreation and a high quality of life.  As a world-class research university, Michigan State University is an economic engine that generates research, innovation, new ventures and intellectual capital that enhance the wealth of our communities and the sustainability of our wildlife, fish and water resources.

One of the most recent, exceptionally innovative programs emerging at MSU is the Boone and Crockett Program, coupled with several affiliated enterprises.  The Boone and Crockett Program is rooted in connection with the Boone and Crockett Club, which was founded in 1887 by Theodore Roosevelt and is nationally recognized for its thoughtful commitment to conservation and a common-sense, business-like approach to managing natural resources for the betterment of wildlife populations and their habitats.  In addition to successfully spearheading key national and state legislation that enhances the well-being and prosperity of our natural resource systems, the club is well known for its active support of research and outreach programs that has allowed for the continuing growth of America’s conservation system, embodying a forward-thinking program of conservation research, education and public service.

The vision of the Boone and Crockett Program at MSU is to integrate science, law and outreach to bring about conservation policies for the wise use and sustainability of natural resources. The resulting outgrowth of this powerful, dynamic partnership will have an unprecedented, lasting impact on the future of conservation…locally, nationally and around the world.

The Boone and Crockett Program at Michigan State University is unlike any other in the nation, connecting a host of private and public organizations and individuals with cutting-edge research with real-world experience, linking wildlife and fisheries science with business, innovation and application that results in increased quality of life and enhanced prosperity for our citizens. The program has a far-reach, interacting with several well-established disciplines, schools and colleges at MSU that include the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the Eli Broad College of Business, MSU’s College of Law, James Madison College, Michigan State University Extension, and MSU’s Graduate School.  In addition to the campus relationships, many partnerships with private and public organizations such as the Great Lakes Fishery Commission and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources flourish under the Boone and Crockett Program at MSU.

MSU’s Boone and Crockett Program currently boast the following enterprises and associated activities:

The Boone and Crockett Chair in Wildlife Conservation is a collaboration between Michigan State University and Boone and Crockett Club members, serving as a catalyst to bridge science with policy by developing and promoting leadership to public and private organizations regarding conservation of wildlife populations and their habitats. This endowed chair will reach out to the academic community, wildlife managers, policy makers, Boone and Crockett Club members, and other stakeholders to develop knowledge, strategies, and methods to enhance wildlife productivity and value to society on local, national and global levels. 

The Boone and Crockett Wildlife Outreach Specialist is a first-of-its kind partnership between the Boone and Crockett Club, a major university and a state natural resource management agency.  The position is a unique venture with Boone and Crockett, Michigan State University Extension and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and is focused on public outreach and engagement to promote and improve joint stewardship of our natural resources.

The Boone and Crockett Undergraduate Internship is designed to articulate in a variety of venues the history, policies and significant impacts the Boone and Crockett Club has had on conservation in North America and encourage students to become leaders who will enhance the stewardship and vitality of our wildlife and fisheries resources in the future.

The first Boone and Crockett undergraduate intern is conducting research on the history of Boone and Crockett Club members from Michigan and their respective impact on policy and practices in North America. 

Executive in Residence at MSU is new to this university but similar programs have enjoyed a long-standing presence in many institutions of higher learning.  Executives in these programs have national or international reputations, bringing great prestige to MSU and a willingness to share their unique insights with students from a real world perspective linking theory to practice.  This program will investigate finding solutions to issues at multiple geographic scales and offer new ways of thinking and acting towards the most pressing problems facing society in the years to come. 

The William A. Demmer Endowed Scholar in Natural Resource Enterprise and Conservation Leadership is the inaugural scholar to be housed in MSU’s Executive in Residence Program.  This scholar will contribute to the Boone and Crockett Program at MSU through work with policy makers, natural resource managers, faculty colleagues, natural resource industries and their constituents to develop knowledge, tools and methods required to make decisions and shape policies in response to changes in the supply chain related to fish, wildlife and related natural resources at the local, regional, national and global levels. This individual will also provide opportunities for our outstanding undergraduate and graduate students to become interns with key natural resources agencies at the state, national and international levels of organization, thereby ensuring that they will have leadership roles in enhancing wildlife sustainability and prosperity in the years to come based on the Boone and Crockett creed.

Mr. Mark Rey is the inaugural William A. Demmer Endowed Scholar in Natural Resource Enterprise and Conservation Leadership. Three courses are affiliated with this program including: Elements of Federal Policy in Natural Resources; Advocacy in the Natural Resources Arena; and History of the American Conservation Experience.  Mr. Rey also offers a Natural Resources Science and Policy Course with paid internships in Washington D. C. This course reviews and evaluates how each branch of the federal government, as well as nongovernment entities, affect the development and implementation of federal government policy in the natural resources.

Business Strategies for Environmental Sustainability and Conservation Graduate Specialization is a first-ever graduate specialization to focus on business strategies related to environmental sustainability and natural resources conservation.  The specialization will bring about an understanding of the challenges of environmental sustainability and natural resources conservation, the tools of business management and subtleties of leadership in an economic-driven decision-making process and how to apply those tools in natural resources and environmental decision contexts. Picture a process that moves fish or wildlife along a supply chain from the water or land to the dinner table, including the intrinsic enrichment created by the experience of wildlife watching, hunting and fishing. Understanding these processes requires basic knowledge of supply chain management as well as the ecological process that produces these fish and wildlife populations and their habitats.   Upon completion of this specialization, students will own a skill set rich in human dimension, communication, ethics and philosophy, policy and law, and business philosophy and procedures with application in supply chain management, marketing, entrepreneurship and leadership.

Theodore (Teddy) Roosevelt Conservation and Environmental Leadership Endowment is focused on the increasing awareness and need for scholarly activity in the arena of conservation leadership. Recognizing Michigan State University’s commitment to sustainability, the Graduate School at MSU has created the Theodore (Teddy) Roosevelt Conservation and Environmental Leadership Endowment.  The endowment, named for the founder of the Boone and Crockett Club, will allow graduate students from a variety of disciplines to build their capacity and acquire tools for leadership by attending experiential leadership training programs outside of the traditional academic setting.  The endowment is dedicated to the pursuit of shaping individuals for leadership by providing opportunities in experiential leadership workshops and programs related to conservation of our natural and environmental resources at local and global levels.

Boone and Crockett Club Distinguished Lectureship Series will offer quality public seminars and lectures by leading conservationists to stimulate and enhance the intellectual climate of the university and surrounding communities.  Students, faculty and administrators will be able to meet with and exchange thoughts on how best to address the challenges of conservation and sustainability of our natural resources.

Dr. Hal Salwasser, Dean, College of Forestry, Oregon State University, was the inaugural speaker for the Lectureship series and shared his view on “Foundations of American Wildlife Conservation Past and Future: The Need for Leaders to Match the Times.”

Conservation Law Program recognizes the need to increase specialization among legal practitioners in the field of science-based conservation. The Boone and Crockett Club in coordination with Michigan State University and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources are designing a novel conservation law program that will ground law students in the fundamental concepts that have governed and guided the conservation movement. As natural resources issues have traditionally been played out in state legislatures and the ballot boxes, we are increasingly seeing the resolution of natural resources issues in the courtroom, and in many cases these issues are being litigated by attorneys with no formal training or sensitivity to the complex nature of these issues. This program will alter the course of conservation law through a rigorous curriculum that will enhance a well-rounded legal education coupled with a conservation law clinic at MSU

John and Marnie Demmer Shooting Sports, Education and Training Center is a fully endowed, world-class facility dedicated to many of the same principles as the Boone and Crockett Club—promotion of firearms safety, hunter safety, wildlife management education and shooting sports skills development. 
As of October 5, 2009, target shooters and archers have a new location to learn, hone their skills and brush up on hunting safety, with the opening of Michigan State University’s John and Marnie Demmer Shooting Sports Education and Training Center. The $3.5 million, 24,000-square-foot facility will allow the public to learn shooting safety and improve shooting and archery skills, in addition to housing MSU club shooting sports — small bore, air rifle and archery. Other potential uses include academic programs in shooting sports, law enforcement and related curricula and NCAA competitive shooting events. Visit the Demmer Center’s website to learn more about this world-class shooting sports education and training facility.

Shooting Sports Club Endowed Scholarships are aimed at recruiting and retaining students to participate in archery or rifle competition on behalf of MSU.  Students who receive these scholarships must not only meet high scholastic standards, they must demonstrate leadership in shooting sports, which runs parallel to the mission of the Boone and Crockett Club’s belief in leadership, healthy competition and safe shooting sports. Visit the Demmer Center’s website to learn more about the MSU undergraduate shooting sports scholarships.

PERM (Partnership for Ecosystem Research and Management) is a partnership built around enhancing the ability of MSU to work with its partners— the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, and other stakeholders—toward identifying significant wildlife and fisheries ecosystem and supply chain problems and conducting research toward their solutions. PERM’s novel approach promotes cooperation among its partners, facilitates cutting-edge natural resources research, and applies results to resource management.  It is through PERM that the Boone and Crockett Wildlife Outreach Specialist is partially funded, along with a number of fisheries and wildlife faculty and graduate students. To learn more about PERM visit the Partnership for Ecosystem Research and Management page. 

Partnership for Ecosystem Research and Management (PERM)

A PERManent future for natural resources

Background: On April 22, 1993, Earth Day marked the renaissance of the innovative Partnership for Ecosystem Research and Management (PERM) program between Michigan State University and the Fisheries and Wildlife Divisions of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR). The PERM program was enriched by establishing agency supported faculty positions to improve the ability of the university and MDNR to work with other stakeholders toward identifying significant ecosystem problems and conducting research and outreach toward their solution. PERM’s novel approach to promoting cooperation among its partners, facilitating cutting-edge natural resource research, and applying results to resource management soon attracted other partners including the MDNR’s Forest Management Division, the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, and the U.S. Geological Survey.

Objectives of PERM include:

  • Augment regional capability for ecosystem-level applied research
  • Provide outreach services to management agencies
  • Serve as a liaison between management agencies and other MSU entities that conducts cooperative research, education and outreach on high priority problems

PERM faculty members bring a common ecosystem perspective and emphasis on state-of-the-art qualitative and quantitative approaches to meet the needs of partner agencies. The research efforts of PERM faculty are augmented by graduate research assistants, visiting professors, academic specialists, postdoctoral associates, and undergraduate interns. In addition to addressing research needs of the partner organizations, PERM faculty provide significant technical and outreach expertise that serve agency information and technology transfer needs as well building capacity to make sustainable decisions about Michigan’s ecosystems.

PERM Faculty

  • Jim Bence
  • Mary Bremigan
  • Jordan Burroughs
  • Dan Hayes
  • Dana Infante
  • Dan Kramer
  • Weiming Li
  • Frank Lupi
  • Shawn Riley
  • Kim Scribner
  • Michael Wagner

PERM Links

Science, Technology, Environment and Public Policy (STEPPS)

Students who pursue the STEPPS minor are interested in how science and politics relate to one another. It is designed for both science and non-science majors, and allows students to personalize their classes to allow them to pursue specific science policy topics that interest them.

STEPPS is a unique cross-collegiate program that brings together James Madison College, Lyman Briggs College, and the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. Drawing on the energies of these three programs, STEPPS will train you in public policy that relates to science, technological change, and environmental science to promote change, become leaders and formulate effective public policy.

STEPPS offers experiential learning opportunities through study abroad to locations such as Costa Rica, the Mediterranean and the Bahamas and internships with agencies such as the Sierra Club, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense and the Environmental Law Institute. This minor will also prepare you for graduate work in policy sciences, environmental law, science and technology studies, and natural resources management.

Academic minors at Michigan State University let you explore and strengthen your understanding of interdisciplinary subjects. The completion of a minor is officially noted on your undergraduate transcript. With advisor approval, courses that apply to a minor may also be used to meet certain major or cognate requirements.

For more information, visit MSU‘s James Madison College.

Marine Ecosystem Management

The Minor in Marine Ecosystem Management is designed to provide students with a fundamental background in ecosystem management of marine natural resources.

Students gain insight and experience in marine management issues relative to estuarine, coastal, and open-water marine ecosystems from the perspective of habitat, biota and human resource users.

Students are also exposed to the management skills necessary to recognize and use effective techniques to conserve, preserve and restore marine ecosystem integrity for the benefit of society.

The Minor in Marine Ecosystem Management is available as an elective to students who are enrolled in Bachelor of Science degree programs with majors in Fisheries and Wildlife; Lyman Briggs; Community Sustainability; and Zoology.

Requirements

Marine Ecosystem Management

All of the following courses must be completed (14 cr.)

  • FW 110 Conservation and Management of Marine Resources (3 cr.)
  • FW 416 Marine Ecosystem Management (3 cr.)
  • ZOL 303 Oceanography (4 cr.)
  • ZOL 353 Marine Biology (4 cr.)

Biodiversity

One of the following courses: (4 cr.)

  • FW 471 Ichthyology (4 cr.)
  • PLB 424 Algal Biology. (4 cr.)
  • ZOL 306 Invertebrate Biology (4 cr.)

Experiential Learning in Marine Ecosystem Management

One of the following courses which must contain a marine emphasis: (2 or 4 cr.)

  • FW 480 International Studies in Fisheries and Wildlife (3 cr.)
  • FW 493 Professional Internships in Fisheries and Wildlife (2 or 3 cr.)
  • ZOL 496 Internship in Zoology (4 cr.)
  • ZOL 498 Internship in Zoo and Aquarium Science (4 cr.)

 

Who to Contact

Jim Schneider, Undergraduate Program Coordinator
Department of Fisheries & Wildlife
Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road; Room 40
East Lansing, MI 48824
(517) 353-9091
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Conservation, Recreation and Environmental Enforcement

Minor in Conservation, Recreation and Environmental Enforcement

The Minor in Conservation, Recreation and Environmental Enforcement is designed to combine the natural resource expertise of the fisheries and wildlife, forestry, parks, recreation and tourism, and resource development programs, with the law enforcement expertise of the criminal justice program to serve those students with career interests in conservation or environmental law enforcement. The minor is available as an elective to students enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs in criminal justice, fisheries and wildlife, forestry, park, recreation and tourism resources, and resource development. The minor is administered by the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife.

Students who are interested in enrolling should contact to the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife for admission. Contact Jim Schneider, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Academic Advising Center, 40 Natural Resources Building, 517-353-9091, .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), to sign up.

With the approval of the department and college that administer the student’s degree program, courses that are used to satisfy the requirements for the specialization may also be used to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor’s degree.

 

Requirements for the Minor in Conservation, Recreation and Environmental Enforcement (19-21 credits)

The student must complete:

Conservation, Recreation and Environmental Enforcement Foundations ( 4 credits)

 1.  Complete ALL of the following courses (4 credits)

CJ                110      Introduction to Criminal Justice                                                            3

       CSUS         278        Intro to Conservation, Recreation and Environmental Enforcement   1

 

Natural Resources Conservation and Management (6-7 credits)

1.  One of the following courses (3 credits):

        CSUS       200      Introduction to Sustainability                                                               3

        CSUS       276      Sustaining Our National Parks and Recreation Lands                        3

        FW           101      Fundamentals of Fisheries and Wildlife                                              3

        FOR         202      Introduction to Forestry                                                                       3

 

2.  One of the following courses (3-4 credits):

        CSUS    320         Environmental Management and Planning                                           3

        CSUS    476         Natural Resource Recreation Management                                        4

        FW        444         Conservation Biology                                                                          3

        FW        481         Global Issues in Fisheries and Wildlife                                                3

 

Environmental Attitudes, Policy and Law (3 credits)

1.  One of the following courses (3 credits):

     CSUS          310      History of Environmental Thought & Sustainability                              3

     CSUS          464      Environmental and Natural Resource Policy in Michigan                     3

     CSUS          465      Environmental Law and Policy                                                            3

     FW              434      Human Dimensions of Fisheries and Wildlife Management                 3

     FW              445      Socio-economic and Policy of Conservation Biology                          3

     FOR            330      Human Dimensions of Forests                                                            3

     FOR            466      Natural Resources Policy                                                                    3

     MC              450      International Environmental Law and Policy                                        3

     SOC            452      Environment and Society                                                                    3        

     ZOL            446      Environmental Issues and Public Policy                                              3

 

Law Enforcement (6 credits)

1.   Two of the following courses (6 credits):

      CJ    210     Introduction to Forensic Science                                                                           3

      CJ    220     Criminology                                                                                                             3

      CJ    235     Investigation Procedures                                                                                       3

      CJ    275     Criminal Procedure                                                                                                 3

      CJ   335      Policing                                                                                                                   3

      CJ   432      Community Policing                                                                                                 3

Upon completion of the requirements for the minor in conservation, recreation and environmental enforcement, the student should contact the Undergraduate Program Coordinator of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and request certification for the completion of the minor. After the certification is approved by the Undergraduate Program Coordinator of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and the Director of Academic Affairs of the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the Office of the Registrar will enter on the student’s academic record the name of the minor and the date that it was completed. This certification will appear on the student’s transcript.

Finding FW Employment

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife is committed to doing everything in its power to help its students and alumni find employment within the fisheries and wildlife field. The Fisheries & Wildlife Employment Resources website contains a collection of many of the employment resources presently available to fisheries and wildlife students to find jobs and careers in the field.

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE RESOURCES!

  • The FW Employment Websites page contains links to a variety of different environmental employment sites. Spend some time exploring each site and then bookmark those sites which contain the types of positions you’re looking for.

  • If you’re looking for employment in a particular state, check out either State Natural Resource Agency Websites or State Employment Websites. States have a variety of means of advertising their open positions; some Natural Resource departments will advertise their positions directly, while others post their openings through the State’s Human Resources office.

  • While ALL federal job announcements are available at USAJOBS,Federal Natural Resource Agency Websites provides links to all those federal agencies that might hire fisheries and wildlife students. Use these links for career exploration and to find out what each of these agencies is all about.

  • Considering graduate school, Fisheries & Wildlife Graduate Programs provides links to sites that list ALL the Fisheries and Wildlife graduate programs in North America, types of degrees offered and entrance requirements. You can also find links to sites that provide listings of available graduate assistantships.

  • FW-JOBS & FWGRADJOBS are electronic bulletin boards which post summer, temporary, and permanent fisheries and wildlife job announcements. These listservs are meant to serve current undergraduates looking for career building experiences, and recent graduates and alumni looking for graduate positions or permanent employment.

  • The MSU Career Services and Placement office also offers a number of employment resources helpful to MSU students and alumni, including MySpartanCareer, Career Fairs, Resume Critiques, and a variety of other services.

 

This site contains A LOT of valuable employment information. Take some time and explore it ALL.

Please contact Jim Schneider at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or (517) 353-9091, if you have any comments or question regarding fisheries and wildlife employment, or if there is anything that could be added or changed to this site that could assist you in finding employment

Study Abroad

Did you know MSU is the nation’s #1 school for study abroad?

Faculty and graduate students in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife lead one (1) spring break, five (5) summer and one (1) winter break study abroad programs.

See the programs listed below. For more information you may also contact the MSU Study Abroad web site.

SPRING BREAK

Nicaragua
Rainforests and Reality Lyman Briggs College
Drs. Gerald (Jerry) Urquhart or Maxine Davis
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) OR .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

SUMMER

Fiji
A Fragile Fiji: Integrating Ecosystems and Human Dimensions in the Face of Climate Change
Ms. Tracy Swem, Mr. Alex Killon, and Dr. Gary Roloff
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), OR .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
A Fragile Fiji Study Abroad website

Greece and Turkey
Environmental Science and Policy in the Eastern Mediterranean Basin
Drs. William Taylor & Norm Graham 
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  OR .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
MSU Greece and Turkey Study Abroad’s Facebook page

Madagascar
Paradise in Peril? Exploring Madagascar’s Biodiversity Crisis
Dr. Meredith Gore
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
MSU Madagascar Study Abroad’s Facebook page

South Africa
Conservation and Biodiversity in Parks and Nature Reserves
Mr. Jim Schneider
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

United Kingdom: England, London and Scotland, Edinburgh
Environmental Science, Policy, and Criminology
Drs. William Taylor & Edmund McGarrell
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)  OR .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

WINTER BREAK

Antarctica
Studies in Antarctic System Science
Drs. Jen Owen & Mary Tate Bremigan
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) OR .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Graduate Specializations

Specializations for graduate students in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife are:

Outreach and Extension

We proactively manage the interplay between locally identified needs/demands and our role as information providers to help people solve problems and create long-term empowerment, understanding, and problem-solving/decision-making capabilities. We seek measurable quality in outreach programming, on impacts on the resource, and on citizens’ quality of life.

 

What is Outreach?

On a University level, MSU defines “Outreach” as…

“Outreach is a form of scholarship that cuts across teaching, research, and service. It involves generating, transmitting, applying, and preserving knowledge for the direct benefit of external audiences in ways that are consistent with university and unit missions.”
. . . transforms and strengthens community/university partnerships
. . . applies knowledge to address key societal issues

http://outreach.msu.edu/

Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Outreach values and principles

  • Land-Grant philosophy: meeting locally-defined needs, helping and empowering citizens to “help themselves,” and providing citizens access to university resources for improving their quality of life.
  • Works in the interface between habitats, populations, and human dimensions of fisheries and wildlife management
  • Coordination of outreach is important
  • We need to let people (internally and externally) know what fisheries and wildlife management is, and how outreach is one effective management tool
  • We seek measurable quality in outreach programming and in impacts of programs
  • Proactive rather than reactive

 


Current Outreach in Our Department

Current outreach projects being conducted by faculty and staff in Fisheries and Wildlife include:

Emerging diseases in fish and wildlife populations

Fish and wildlife diseases that impact the health and well being of Michigan’s natural resources, citizens and agricultural interests are on the rise.

Outreach related to emerging diseases in fish and wildlife populations:

  • Technical support provided to the NRC and MDNR on deer baiting and feeding regulations to eradicate bovine TB
  • Presentations at public meetings with NGO’s on bovine TB
  • Extension brochure and programs on whirling disease in trout
  • NCRAC projects on fish disease management
  • Sampling protocols for Lake Michigan chinook salmon health assessment

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Human-wildlife interactions

Changing human demographic and expanding urban and suburban land uses, coupled with shifts in the size and distribution of wild populations result in interactions that are often potentially injurious to both.

Outreach related to human-wildlife interactions:

  • Communications of bear issues to southern Michigan residents
  • Technical advice for Detroit Metro parks regarding deer population impacts
  • Advice to DNR, Mississippi Flyway Council on goose harvest regulations

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Aquatic nuisance species (ANS)

Exotic species invasions have led to drastic changes in aquatic ecosystems throughout North America and the world. We are working on many fronts to assess and mitigate the effects of these aquatic nuisance species.

Outreach related to aquatic nuisance species (ANS):

  • Sea Grant Extension specialist on ANS - numerous publications, presentations, etc. (including 4-H Purple Loosestrife Project)
  • Examples of outreach publications:
    • “Coping with zebra mussels” - an outreach program for municipal/industrial water users
    • “Citizen lake monitoring”
    • “Purple loosestrife” - biological control in Michigan
  • Information summary on Sonar to Michigan Environmental Science Board
  • Presentations on Sonar research findings to Lake Associations, DNR fisheries and wildlife divisions, scientific meetings
  • Posters on Sonar for Ag Expo and Outdoor Expo
  • MSU Extension bulletin “Integrated Pest Management for Nuisance Exotics in Michigan Inland Lakes”
  • Regular advice to sea lamprey program staff; membership on Task Forces; leadership for GLFC sea lamprey research program

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Harvest management

A significant portion of Michigan’s tourist and recreation income, as well as the quality of life for Michigan’s citizens, is dependent upon having viable fish and wildlife populations.

Outreach related to harvest management:

  • Technical advice to DNR / GLFC / CORA (tribal fishery authority) on fishery harvest capacity and allocation issues
  • Technical advice to federal and state agencies on hatchery management practices
  • Advice to DNR and NRC on setting wildlife harvest regulations
  • Leadership for revisions of inland fishery regulations
  • Articles on deer management in Michigan Out-of-Doors magazine
  • Advice to Canadian and U.S. agencies on goose harvest management

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Ecosystem management: landscape and watersheds

Natural resource management is undergoing a transition from species-oriented to ecosystem-oriented problem solving. Our Department has made a strategic commitment to advancing the science of ecosystem management.

Outreach related to ecosystem management: landscape and watersheds:

  • Collaboration with state DNR; advice on management strategies
  • Legal dimensions of policy development for ecosystem management in Malawi
  • Community outreach on status the Red Cedar watershed
  • Workshops on preparing watershed management plans
  • Technical support through the regional CRP study to the U.S. Congress on the Farm Bill
  • Pond management workshops and extension programs
  • Wetland management consultation with communities and agencies

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Ecosystem management: Great Lakes

The Great Lakes comprise a vast aquatic resource in which the State of Michigan has a major interest. The bi-national organizations (GLFC, IJC) that oversee Great Lakes resources are committed to ecosystem approaches to management of fisheries and other aquatic resources.

Outreach related to ecosystem management: Great Lakes:

  • “Life of the Lake” - award-winning TV documentary
  • Sea Grant Extension agents advise the GLFC and MDNR
  • Sea Grant Extension public education workshops
  • Sea Grant Extension assisted discussion of Great Lakes fishery management issues (e.g., salmonid stocking cuts, perch decline)
  • Annual Great Lakes Conference during ANR week
  • Membership on GLFC Board of Technical Experts (science advice to Commission)
  • Regular attendance at meetings, and technical advice for Great Lakes fishery management committees, and technical committees.
  • Advice to multiple state, federal, and international agencies on hatchery practices
  • 4-H Great Lakes and Natural Resources Teen Leadership Camp

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Natural resource management systems

Technological advances in data and information management systems, as well as knowledge of organizational theory and behavior form the background to many innovative contributions we are making to improving resource management systems.

Outreach related to Natural resource management systems:

  • Collaboration with state agencies and NGOs for statewide lake classification system
  • Collaboration with MDNR on creation of statewide lake GIS database
  • Leadership in development of resource inventory methods for DNR fishery division
  • Wetland bioassesment technique workshops
  • Workshops on decision analysis, stock assessment, risk assessment for fishery management agencies and stakeholders
  • Development of strategic planning/decision models for wildlife management
  • Captive cervid “white paper” to MDNR and MDA
  • DEER-MOM - training model for population/habitat issues for deer management

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Tribal rights to natural resources

The formal recognition of Native American rights to use of fish and wildlife resources, established during the 19th century, has become a key issue for resource management in Michigan. We have played an important technical role in the negotiations over fishing rights in Great Lakes waters, and will continue to contribute to the debate over use of inland wildlife and fishery resources.

Outreach related to tribal rights to natural resources:

  • Video on gill net fishing and Consent Decree requirements (Sea Grant Extension)
  • Extensive interaction with state and tribal biologists to apply (and train in the use of) stock assessment models
  • Technical advice to parties for negotiations for wildlife and inland fishery harvest

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Natural resource stewardship development

Conservation and rehabilitation of fish and wildlife resources and their ecosystems (the Department mission) will require citizens with a strong and effective sense of stewardship to implement science-based resource management. We address this need as well as the need for resource science.

Outreach related to Natural resource stewardship development:

  • Information Exchange
  • Detroit River Remedial Action Plan - with Wayne county MSU Extension
  • LeadNet AoE Team - Community Action Leadership
  • Facilitator for South Branch Mill Creek Inter-county Drain, Technical Advisory Committee
  • Project F.I.S.H.
  • Burke Lake Banding Station
  • 4-H Shooting Sports program
  • 4-H Natural Resources/Environmental Education program (volunteer and teacher training programs, curriculum and project guides, state-wide and county-based events, etc.)
  • Stewardship ethics curriculum for International Hunter Education Association
  • Development of Lake Leaders Institute for Michigan Lakes and Stream Association
  • Development of Great Lakes Fisheries Leadership Institute for various fisheries stakeholders
  • GLEP - ship-based Great Lakes outdoor education courses

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Conservation biology/ecosystem restoration

Human activities continue to have impacts on fish and wildlife populations. We continue to work closely with public and private agencies on the protection of animal populations at risk and the restoration of already degraded populations and the habitats upon which they depend.

Outreach related to conservation biology/ecosystem restoration:

  • Advice to U.S. FWS on lake trout hatchery management practices
  • Advice to U.S. FWS and MDNR on ecological classification and identification of biodiversity conservation areas
  • Technical advice on contaminant issues, related to Saginaw Bay ecosystem restoration
  • Advice to Kirland’s warbler recovery team

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Youth Programs

We participate in three youth programs:
4-H Great Lakes and Natural Resources Camp
Project FISH
Burke Lake Banding Station

Affiliated Centers

Affiliated Centers

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife also supports faculty efforts in several centers across campus. Learn more about each of them by clicking on the links below.

  • Center for Water Sciences
    The mission of The Center for Water Sciences (CWS) at MSU is to advance scientific research and knowledge for understanding, protecting, and restoring water resources and their sustainable use by humans and ecosystems around the Great Lakes and the world.

  • Center of Advancing Microbial Risk Assessment
    The Center for Advancing Microbial Risk Assessment (CAMRA) is an interdisciplinary research center established to develop scientific knowledge on the fate and risk of bioterrorist and other high priority infectious agents.

  • Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability
    Our mission is to develop and maintain a center of excellence that integrates ecology with socioeconomics, demography, and other disciplines for ecological sustainability from local, national, to global scales.

  • Quantitative Fisheries Center
    The Quantitative Fisheries Center came into being in July of 2005. We seek to provide a research, outreach/service and teaching program to (1) build greater capacity within fishery management agencies in quantitative methods; (2) improve quantitative methods for assessing fish stocks; (3) assist agencies to use model-based approaches in decision making; (4) develop a better understanding of fish community and population dynamics.

Responsible Conduct of Research

The documents below are needed when doing research. 

Background

This document provides background information on why all departmental personnel involved in research must complete the Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training.

Requirements

This document summarizes the RCR training requirements that must be met by all FW department personnel involved in research. 

Documenting your RCR training

The document is intended for all personnel involved in research who, as described in the “requirements” document, must document their RCR training.  This file contains the link to the Research Training Tracking System (RTTS), where RCR training will be documented.  This file also contains step-by-step directions on how to use/navigate through the RTTS.

Obtaining the training records for your people

This document is intended for all major professors/principal investigators.  It contains the link to the Research Training Tracking System and directions for accessing the training records for an individual faculty member’s research personnel.

If you have problems accessing the system, entering your training information or accessing the information about your research personnel please contact Scott Winterstein at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

As we all gain experience with the RTTS and Dr. Winterstein will begin to accumulate questions, an FAQ page will be added to this site.

The following PDF’s are part of a Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training presentation provided by Dr. Dan Hayes, Professor and Associate Chairperson.

  1. Responsible Conduct of Research, Scholarship and Creative Activities
  2. Data Acquisition, Managmenet, Sharing and Ownership
  3. Publication Practices and Responsible Authorship
  4. Peer Review
  5. Conflict of Interest
  6. Collaboration
  7. Mentoring
  8. Misconduct

Giving to FW

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife strongly supports Michigan State University’s guiding principle to improve access to quality education and expert knowledge. These endowments were established with the intent to enhance the education and research capabilities of our undergraduate and graduate students.

All gifts to endowments are recognized by the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. All donors will be given credit and membership in the appropriate MSU donor recognition club according to gift qualifications. All gifts to Michigan State University are tax deductible on your federal taxes and may qualify Michigan residents for a Michigan tax credit.

Currently Established Funds:

 

Support the Burke Lake Banding Station

The overall goal of the Burke Lake Banding Station is to integrate avian research, the training of current and future wildlife professionals, and the education of people of all ages in the mid-Michigan region, while showcasing the diversity of wildlife inhabiting one of mid-Michigan’s most diverse wildlife research areas. Specifically, the banding station will (1) collect long-term data on the health of the landbird community of the Rose Lake State Wildlife Research Area during breeding and migratory seasons, (2) provide university students the opportunity to be active participants in ongoing research and learn skills associated with capturing and handling of wild birds, (3) engage with children of all ages with hands-on activities in a science-related discipline, and (4) provide a unique opportunity for bird enthusiasts in the Great Lakes region on state-managed land.

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I would like to donate to the Burke Lake Banding Station  - http://givingto.msu.edu/crowdpower/burke-lake-bird-banding-station.cfm

 

SAVE THE MSU POLAR BEAR

The Polar Bear Restoration Fund has been established to refurbish the polar bear that stands guard in the main entrance of the Natural Resources Building.  Spartans remember those late nights and early mornings with the ever-present bear standing his post to greet them, wish them luck on that final exam, and bid them farewell as they venture out into an uncertain future as natural resource professionals.  Whether you wish to call it a symbol, a mascot, an icon, or a long standing tradition, our bear has tirelessly witnessed our societal triumphs and failures in the conservation of our natural resources and needs our help to be restored.  Contributions to this fund will go to the restoration of our bear (estimated at $6000).  Any excess funds will be used to support student organizations, teaching and reseach within the department.  To read the full story, see Save Our Polar Bear.

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I would like to donate to this fund.

 

Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Endowments:

The Robert C. and Betty Ball Fisheries and Wildlife Fellowship Fund was established in 2000 by Dr. Robert and Mrs. Betty Ball to provide support for students who are pursuing degrees in fisheries and wildlife, with preference to those who are working on advanced degrees in fisheries, limnology, or water quality. The fellowship is intended to assist in recruiting students who will become nationally recognized leaders in these aquatics fields, as many of Dr. Ball’s students have done since leaving MSU.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

 

The Boone and Crockett Club Endowment Fund was established in 2006 for the purposes of establishing an Endowed Professorship of Wildlife Conservation. This endowed chair will work to create the future leaders for state, tribal, national and global wildlife resource management agencies and a public more informed about wildlife conservation. The endowment supports the research, outreach and graduate programs associated with this professorship.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

  

The Janice Lee Fenske Excellence in Fisheries Management Fellowship Fund was established to honor Ms. Jan Fenske. Jan Fenske was the first female biologist for the Fisheries Division of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. During her 27 years of service, her love of the environment compelled her to work untiringly for the long-term protection and sustainable use of the State’s aquatic resources. The intent of this award is to honor Jan’s attitude, deep commitment to the resource, integrity, and memory by providing graduate students from the under-served community in the Department with additional financial and mentoring opportunities to assist them in developing successful careers in fisheries management.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

 

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Endowed Scholarship Fund was established to honor and encourage students (undergraduate and graduate) who have demonstrated sound academic performance and a commitment to a career in natural resources management.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

 

The Fisheries Research Excellence Endowment Fund was established in 1993 with gifts from individuals and organizations who have an interest in the continuation of research in fisheries science. Income from the fund is used to provide basic research support which may include support of faculty or post-doctoral salaries, graduate student assistantships, the purchase of equipment or travel required in the department’s fisheries research programs. Much of the support to date has gone towards support of graduate student travel to professional and scientific meetings where they present results of their research.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

 

The Hal and Jean Glassen Wildlife Conservation and Stewardship Endowment Fund was established in 1997 by the Harold and Jean Glassen Foundation. Its focus is to enhance wildlife, shooting activities, environmental and outdoor education and leadership programs for Michigan’s citizens. Funds generated through the endowment help to support club development for youth shooting sports, as well as provide equipment, adult leader training and instructional materials. MSU staff will continue to help county-level programs provide resource materials and train new leaders.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

 

The Michigan Charter Boat Association Scholarship Fund was established in 1997 by the Michigan Charter Boat Association to encourage students who have demonstrated capacity to achieve educational and professional goals, the motivation to achieve these goals, and the initiative to seek opportunities to further their progress. The Department selects one undergraduate student per year as a recipient of a scholarship from this endowment.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

The Mixed Rifle Team Endowed Fund is was established to support activities for the Mixed Rifle Team, which may included, but is not limited to, support of an MSU sanctioned rifle club or varsity sport and multi-use facility.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

You may also be interested to learn more about the John and Marnie Demmer Shooting Sports Education and Training Center on the MSU campus.

 

The Mixed Rifle Team Endowed Scholarship Fund like the Mixed Rifle Team Endowment Fund is was established to support the Mixed Rifle team and / or rifle club sports. Specifically, this endowment awards scholarships to students participating in either the Mixed Rifle Team and / or rifle team sports.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

You may also be interested to learn more about the John and Marnie Demmer Shooting Sports Education and Training Center on the MSU campus. To learn more click here.

  

The Rachana Rajendra Neotropical Migrant Bird Sanctuary Endowment Fund was established in 1998 by Dr. and Mrs. Kunwar Rajendra of East Lansing, Michigan, to honor the memory of their daughter, Rachana, and to share her love of birds with others. Rachana, who died in an automobile accident in 1997, was a graduate of the University of Michigan, College of Engineering. The endowment is meant to provide funding for fisheries and wildlife students who are interested in avian species research and conservation, particularly in the Rachana Rajendra Neotropical Migrant Bird Sanctuary in the Baker Woodlot on the MSU campus.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

  

The Peter and Elizabeth Tack Endowed Scholarship Fund in Fisheries and Wildlife was established in 1999 by Dr. and Mrs. Tack to provide support and encouragement to undergraduate students in the fisheries and wildlife major who have demonstrated the capacity to achieve educational and professional goals, the motivation to achieve these goals, and the initiative to seek opportunities to further their progress.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

 

The William E. Ricker Fellowship Fund was established to honor Dr. William E. Ricker. Dr. Ricker was one of the world’s most respected fishery scientists, probably most famous for developing the “Ricker curve”, a relationship between adult fish abundance and the future production of young fish. His model of so-called stock and recruitment is a cornerstone of modern fisheries management. Additionally, his “Computation and Interpretation of Biological Statistics of Fish Populations”, published in 1975 and known among fishery biologists the world over as “The Green Book” remains to this day the most widely used resource for practicing biologists and managers in fisheries. Income from the fund will be used to support graduate students working on quantitative fisheries science.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

  

The William W. and Evelyn M. Taylor Endowed Fellowship for International Engagement in Coupled Human and Natural Systems was established by William W. Taylor and his wife Evelyn. Dr. Taylor served as the Chairperson of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife from 1992 - 2008. The goal of the endowment is to provide opportunities for fisheries and wildlife related graduate students to significantly engage in understanding the scientific and cultural challenges and opportunities dealing with couple human and natural systems at the global level. This interest is a result of the impact that Bill and Evelyn experience through multiple interactions with other cultures regarding the importance of fish, wildlife and water resources.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

  

The Wildlife Research Excellence Endowed Fund was established in 1993 with gifts from individuals and organizations who have an interest in the continuation of research in wildlife science. Income from the fund is used to provide basic research support which may include support of faculty or post-doctoral salaries, graduate student assistantships, the purchase of equipment or travel required in the department’s wildlife research programs. Much of the support to date has gone toward support of graduate student travel to professional and scientific meetings where they present results of their research.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

  

The Youth Education and Aquatic Stewardship Legacy Fund is an endowment intended to support a variety of youth and adult programs related to natural resources stewardship. The endowment was initiated in 1997 by gifts from individuals and organizations, including the American Fisheries Society, to enhance youth educational programs that offer hands-on experiences in natural resources management for Michigan’s youth.

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I would like to donate to this endowment

 

For more information about any of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife endowments, please contact the department chairperson. If you would like confidential information on making a gift or establishing an endowment, please contact: Director of Development, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, at 517-355-0284.

Thesis and Dissertation Lists

MS Thesis List 2010-2012

PhD Dissertation List 2010-2012

Graduate Fellowship Opportunities

 

Graduate Fellowships Information

The Janice Lee Fenske Excellence in Fisheries Management Fellowship


     Application due by -

     Past Fellowship Recipients

     Andrew Carlson, 2015-2016
     Elle Gulotty, 2015-2016
     Molly Good, 2014-2015
     Marissa Hammond 2013-2014
     Lisa Peterson 2012-2013
     Hanna Kruckman 2011-2012
     Corrine Higley 2010-2011
     Chiara Zuccarino-Crowe 2010-2011 (funded through GLFC)
     Abigail Lynch 2009-2010
     Heidi Ziegenmeyer 2008-2009
     Amy Schueller 2007-2008

The Hal and Jean Glassen Conservation Medicine Fellowship
     Application due by -

     Past Fellowship Recipients

     Sonj Christensen, 2015-2016    
     Yushi Oguchi, 2014-2015
     Isis Kuczaj 2013-2014

The Annual Dr. Howard A. Tanner Fisheries Excellence Fellowship
     Application due by -

     Past Fellowship Recipients

     Erin Jarvie, 2015-2016
     Marissa Hammond, 2014-2015
     Brandon Armstrong 2013-2014
     Abigail Lynch 2013-2014
     Darren Thornbrugh 2012-2013
     Eric MacMillan 2010-2011
     Jody Simoes 2009-2010
     Laura Claus 2008-2009

The Annual Robert C. Ball and Betty A. Ball Fisheries and Wildlife Fellowship
     Application due by -

     Past Fellowship Recipients

     Darrin McCullough, 2015-2016    
     Jeffery White, 2014-2015
     No Award 2013-2014
     Jason Smith 2012-2013
     Seth Herbst 2011-2012
     Darren Thornbrugh 2010-2011
     Jan-Michael Hessenauer 2009-2010
     Arthur Cooper 2008-2009
     Ralph Tingley 2007-2008

The Annual Ambrose Pattullo Fund for Environmental Issues Graduate Fellowship for Literary Work
     Application due by -

     Past Fellowship Recipients

     Remington Moll, 2015-2016
     Yang Li, 2014-2015
     Nathan Snow, 2013-2014
     Nicholas Skaff, 2013-2014
     Kara Stevens, 2012-2013
     Abigail Lynch, 2012-2013
     Kara Stevens (FW), 2009-2010

The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center Science to Action Fellowship
     Application due by -

     Past Fellowship Recipients

     Tracy Swem, 2015-2016
     Ralph Tingley, 2015-2016

 

 

Admissions Requirements

Graduate Application and Information

The following is a summary of the combined University, College and Departmental requirements with some interpretation and discussion of Departmental procedures. The official requirements are those stated in the current Academic Programs Catalogue.

The Department accepts applications throughout the year and some students begin their programs during each semester. The majority of students are accepted to start their programs at the beginning of the fall semester. The University recommends that applications be complete a minimum of two months before the intended start date, and several months earlier than this if applying for financial aid. Most graduate student programs in our department require outside funding to support the research and to provide a Research Assistantship stipend for the student.

Open positions in our graduate program depend upon this funding, and the timing and number of positions is somewhat unpredictable in advance. These positions are filled on a rolling basis as highly qualified students apply. Hence, we strongly encourage you to complete your application as early as possible, to ensure that you are considered for all appropriate openings. In addition, to be given full consideration for Departmental recruiting fellowships, your application needs to be complete by February, and to compete for a University Distinguished Fellowship your application must be complete by January 1.

Graduate openings are generally in specialized areas, and your background and interests play a large role in how competitive you are for a specific opening. You are encouraged to contact individual faculty members who have research interests that match your own, and might serve as your Major Professor and academic advisor. Such contacts can provide you with critical information. You are also encouraged to apply and compete for appropriate non-MSU fellowships, such as those that are awarded by the National Science Foundation and to highlight any such awards in your Statement of Purpose included with your application. Receiving such awards can increase your chances for admission.

To apply to any degree program you must be in your senior year or a graduate of a Bachelor’s degree program comparable to that offered by MSU. To begin a Master’s degree you must have completed a Bachelor’s degree. To begin a Ph.D. program you ordinarily will need to have completed a Master’s degree or the equivalent. Typically the undergraduate major and prior graduate studies will be in an area of the biological or other relevant sciences, and must include course work appropriate to support the graduate program. Students lacking sufficient course work may be admitted provisionally until such deficiencies are removed by completion of collateral courses.

Ordinarily, a minimum GPA of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) during the last two years of an undergraduate degree and in prior graduate programs is required for admission to any status (regular or provisional). The Departmental faculty have agreed to consider provisional acceptance of students with GPA’s in the range of 2.75-3.0. This exception is only made under unusual circumstances where there is strong evidence indicating likely success in graduate studies. Current Departmental practice is to not consider students for admission if their GPA is below 2.75. Acceptance into the Fisheries and Wildlife Department is competitive and the 3.0 GPA requirement is a minimum standard, not a guarantee of acceptance. In recent years the average GPA of incoming graduate students to the Department has exceeded 3.5. Applicants who are not native speakers of English must demonstrate proficiency in English. MSU‘s requirements for English language proficiency for prospective graduate students are summarized here.

Applications are reviewed and evaluated in light of information contained in transcripts, letters of reference, examination scores, and in supporting information supplied by the student. There is no specific required GRE score, but examination results are weighed in admission decisions along with other information.

The General GRE exam is required and an advanced exam (usually Biology) is recommended.

Letter of Recommendation Form

Requests for additional information

Graduate Fees & Financial Aid

Graduate Fees and Financial Aid

The primary source of financial aid within the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife is in the form of Research Assistantships to work on sponsored research projects. General information on financial aid for graduate students is available online from the Graduate School.

Typical assistantship appointments are for either 1/4 or 1/2 time and can be for either an academic year or calendar year. Specific duties are required, which often overlap with the student’s educational goals. The Assistantship includes a stipend, which varies depending upon background, experience and duties. Typically assistantship stipends start at the bottom of the allowable range of Assistant level I for beginning MS students and at the bottom of the allowable range of Assistant level II for beginning Ph.D. students.

Graduate student stipend ranges can be found on the MSU Human Resources website.

Assistantships include the following benefits:

  • Health Insurance
  • Waiver of fees for up to six credit hours each academic semester and four credit hours during the summer.
    Typically students enroll in 6-9 credits each semester when on a half-time assistantship.
  • Waiver of the fee required to enroll each semester (matriculation fee).
  • Additional credits charged at in-state rates for out-of-state students.

Tuition rates and other fees are available from the MSU Controller’s Office.

Focus Areas

Graduate Focus Areas

Within the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University you will find faculty with a diversity of interests, linked to the management of fisheries and wildlife. These interests have been grouped into focus areas which are listed below. These focus areas serve as a guide to help you determine where your particular area of interest lies in relation to the Department. However, they are not intended to be a complete list of the diverse interests and expertise in the Department.

To view a full list of all MSU courses, visit the Office of the Registrar.

 

Focus areas in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Graduate program include: 

 

Wildlife Ecology and Management

General Description: emphasis on biological considerations in the management of upland and wetland ecosystems or wildlife species to meet a variety of human demands from biodiversity and endangered species management to management of game species

Sample Coursework:

wildlife biology and management

wildlife nutrition

population and community ecology

population analysis and quantitative methods

 

Examples of Research Areas:

wildlife - habitat interactions

population dynamics and modeling

environmental or biological issues that affect wildlife in upland or wetland ecosystems

wildlife biometry and population estimation and sampling

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Limnology - includes Stream Ecology and Wetland Ecology and Management

General Description: biological, chemical and ecological features of freshwater ecosystems, including lakes, reservoirs, streams, rivers, and wetlands; basic and applied freshwater ecology, emphasizing the intimate connection between limnology and resource management

Sample Coursework:

limnology and stream ecology

aquatic entomology

plankton biology

wetland plants and algae

fisheries ecology and food-web management

geographic information systems and remote sensing

 

Examples of Research Areas:

food-web interactions

landscape ecology of aquatic ecosystems

exotic species ecology and management

water quality, biomonitoring

non-point source land-use modeling

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Fisheries Science and Management

General Description: emphasis on factors influencing the productivity and dynamics of fish populations, fish communities, and fisheries to enhance management of these resources; quantitative fisheries science, particularly stock assessment; habitat, population and community modeling; and risk assessment and adaptive management

Sample Coursework:

fish population dynamics

fish habitat management

aquatic food web management

simulation modeling

risk assessment and adaptive management

 

Examples of Research Areas:

evaluations of the effectiveness of various management techniques (e.g., habitat manipulation, stocking) for protecting, rehabilitating, and enhancing fish populations and fisheries

investigations of the relationship between the habitat needs of fish populations and their productivity

environmental determinants of fish recruitment

links among food web interactions, fish recruitment and fish production

development and utilization of dynamic fish population and community models

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Conservation Biology

General Description: emphasizes application of ecological and evolutionary theory and principles of fisheries and wildlife management related to the conservation of species, habitat, and genetic diversity

Sample Coursework:

conservation biology and genetics

fisheries/wildlife management

population analysis and management

geographic information systems

population and community ecology

Examples of Research Areas:

evaluation of human impacts on the diversity and viability of wild populations

landscape-level analysis and modeling of habitat quality and quantity on fisheries and wildlife populations

identification of management units and evolutionarily significant units of conservation concern

evaluation of the effects of non-native species on populations and ecosystems

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Human Dimensions of Fisheries and Wildlife Management

General Description: The traditional focus on biology in fisheries and wildlife management has shifted in the past two decades to include the human dimensions (social aspects) of management. Along with managing resource issues, managers must often be experts in human attitudes and behavior, facilitate conflict resolution among user groups, develop communication or education tools, determine economic impacts, and interact with policy makers in legislative or administrative bodies as well as become involved with litigation.

The Human Dimensions program is designed to integrate training in social, ecological, and biological aspects of management. The program can serve to broaden the expertise of wildlife biologists or to train human dimensions specialists to apply appropriate social sciences to management problems.

Students without backgrounds in fisheries and wildlife management will be expected to gain adequate knowledge of that discipline through course work and other experiences. The human dimensions program’s intent is to prepare professionals who can bridge the gaps between the social and biological sciences.

 

Sample Coursework:

social science survey research techniques

qualitative research methods

environmental law and policy

outreach/extension education program design and evaluation

environmental sociology

environmental attitudes and movements

Examples of Research Areas:

outcomes of fisheries co-management policy in developing countries

angling/hunting recruitment/retention

effectiveness of environmental education and outreach

analysis of public perceptions associated with emerging fisheries or wildlife issues

investigations of the dynamics of wildlife recreational choice behaviors

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Aquaculture

General Description: fish culture research and training programs including domestic and international projects emphasizing cold, cool, and warm water fishes; academic programs are tied closely to state, regional, federal, and international partners including the U.S. Department of Agriculture, North Central Regional Aquaculture Center, and state and federal hatchery systems

Sample Course Work:

aquaculture and limnology

animal science and food science and nutrition

physiology

economics

toxicology

sociology

Examples of Research Areas:

nutritional requirements and culture techniques for cool water fishes

diet development using locally available feedstuffs

larval rearing

polyploidy induction techniques

aquaculture water quality and waste control

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Ecological Genetics and Physiology

General Description: emphasis on theory and application of modern molecular, biochemical, and electrophysiological technologies and statistical methods of analysis to examine basic and applied issues in organismal ecology, behavior, environmental adaptability, toxicology, and evolutionary history

Sample Coursework:

conservation genetics and population genetics

population and community ecology

molecular biology

biochemistry

environmental physiology

Examples of Research Areas:

chemoreception of fishes

physiological and genetic factors in fish migratory and sexual behavior

field and experimental approaches in behavioral ecology including defining genealogical relationships, mate selection, reproductive success, maternity and paternity

studies of spatial population genetic structure and systematics

molecular markers in conservation and management of vertebrate populations

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Biometry and Ecological Modeling

General Description: Emphasis on development and application of quantitative tools for estimation, hypothesis testing, and simulation, as applied to fisheries and wildlife problems. This departmental program is complimented by a strong inter-disciplinary university-wide quantitative analysis group.

Sample Coursework:

systems modeling

population analysis

statistical theory and methods

risk assessment and decision analysis

GIS and remote sensing

Examples of Research Areas:

simulation modeling of wildlife-habitat relationships

fish stock assessment methods and application

adaptive management and decision analysis theory and applications

metapopulation analysis and simulation

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Request Information/Apply to MSU

For more information about the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and our undergraduate program you can either write (at the address listed below), call our Academic Advising Center, send us an .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or you can fill out our web form.

  • If you are not a current MSU student and would like to speak with our undergraduate adviser, Mr. Jim Schneider, you can call the Academic Advising Center phone number listed below to get more information or to make an appointment to come to campus and meet with him.

  • If you are a current MSU student, you can make an appointment by calling the Academic Advising Center phone number listed below, stopping by the Advising Center (Room 40 of the Natural Resources Building) or by visiting the Advising Appointment Request System.

Academic Advising Center
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
40 Natural Resources Building
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824-1222
Phone: 517-353-9091

If you’d like to major in Fisheries and Wildlife at MSU - APPLY NOW TO MSU!

 

For information about the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (other Departments and programs, student organizations, etc.), as well as to arrange meetings with other CANR Departments and set up campus tours, please contact:

Nathan Westfall
College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
Office of Academic & Student Affairs
121 Agriculture Hall
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: 517-355-0234
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

For specific information on admissions, scholarships, enrollment, fees and housing check out the following web sites:

Academic Advising

Jim Schneider advises all students majoring or interested in majoring in Fisheries and Wildlife, and students wanting to complete a Minor in Conservation Recreation and Environmental Enforcement or Marine Ecosystem Management. Mr. Schneider also assists with course overrides (FW courses only), approves substitutions, as well as coordinates the fisheries and wildlife internship program.

If you are not an MSU student and would like to meet with Mr. Schneider, please contact the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife’s Undergraduate Advising Center at (517) 353-9091 to schedule an appointment.

MSU students are encourage to use the Online Advising Appointment System. The appointment system allows MSU students to schedule an appointment at their convenience with their academic advisor. MSU students can also call the FW Advising Center (517) 353-9091 or stop by Room 40 in the Natural Resources Building to schedule an appointment. Mr. Schneider does accept walk-in appointments if time permits.

How to use the appointment system:

  • You need your MSUNet ID and password to log on to the appointment system.

  • While the appointment system displays all half hour appointment times that are available, Jim does accept walk-in advising for those quick questions.

  • There may be a time when you must cancel your appointment (ex: illness). The system will allow you to do so, but please cancel with at least 24 hours notice and/or contact the FW Advising Center (353-9091 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)) directly to let them know you’ve canceled, so other students may take advantage of the time slot.

 

Instructions on using the Advising Appointment System

Scroll to bottom of this page and select Go to the ADVISING APPOINTMENT SYSTEM

  • Enter your MSUNet ID (ex: sparty3) and password, Click Submit

  • Select COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES

  • Select FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE

  • Select Adviser - JIM SCHNEIDER

  • Select dates and times convenient for you. Click Submit

  • To confirm your appointment, select View Current Appointments from the Main Menu

  • When finished, LOG OUT

 

Go to the ADVISING APPOINTMENT SYSTEM now

 

Scholarships

Undergraduate Awards & Scholarships

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife’s Undergraduate Awards and Scholarships are highly competitive, and typically go to Fisheries and Wildlife students that are academically strong, active within the department, and active within the profession.

Incoming Freshman Scholarship

Hal and Jean Glassen Wildlife Conservation and Stewardship Scholarship ($5,000/renewable for 4 years)

  • The Hal and Jean Glassen Wildlife Conservation and Stewardship Endowment established a scholarship to encourage students with demonstrated academic excellence and interests in enhancing wildlife conservation and stewardship for Michigan’s citizens, to attend Michigan State University and major in Fisheries and Wildlife.
  • Awarded to an OUTSTANDING incoming freshman.
  • Recipient must maintain a 3.2 or higher cumulative grade point average and major in Fisheries and Wildlife.
  • Students with a high school cumulative GPA of at least a 3.75 will be considered for this scholarship. Preference for students admitted to the MSU Honors College.

Current Student Scholarships

These scholarships are highly competitive. Most scholarships go to students that have been on the MSU campus and have proven themselves for at least 1 semester. We presently do not have scholarships for new transfer students.

In order to be considered for a scholarship, students must apply annually. A call for scholarship applications will be e-mailed to students in the Fall semester, and applications will be made available at the Academic Advising Center (Room 40) or electronically via e-mail or from this website. Recipients will be announced during the Spring semester. Recipients attend the CANR Honors Banquet, which occurs during the Spring semester each year, to honor their accomplishments.

Andy Ammann Chapter of the Ruffed Grouse Society Scholarship ($750)

  • This scholarship goes to a student who has demonstrated high scholarship, special interest in upland ecology, and professional development and potential in forest game bird management.

Rebecca Humphries Undergraduate Scholarship ($1,000)

  • The purpose of this scholarship is to recognize and facilitate individuals from underserved communities to become future leaders in conservation. This award is named in honor of Rebecca Humphries, who became the first female director of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment (MDNRE) on April 19, 2004, after serving 6 years as the Chief of the Wildlife Division. Director Humphries stands at the vanguard of new agency leaders who are not only willing to involve the public, but who also have the skills to involve the public effectively so that the long-term sustainability of the resource is not compromised by short-term societal desires. Rather she understands that resource integrity and productivity is enhanced by the inclusion of society’s diverse voices combined with scientific understanding. She graduated from Michigan State University, with an undergraduate degree in fisheries and wildlife and has received the Distinguished Service to CANR Award (2001), the CANR Outstanding Alumnus Award (2007), and Michigan State University’s Distinguished Alumnus Award (2007). Director Humphries has been a strong and tireless proponent for providing opportunities for underrepresented students including policy internships and the Natural Resources Scholars Program and is an outstanding leader and role model for all biologists; most notably women pursuing natural resources related careers.

Michigan Charter Boat Assoc. Denny Grinold Scholarship (2 @ $1,000)

  • This award is intended to encourage students who have demonstrated the capacity to achieve educational and professional goals, the motivation to achieve these goals, and the initiative to seek opportunities to further their progress. This scholarship is awarded to students interested in fishing issues, especially dealing with Great Lakes and sports fishing.

International Wildlife Undergraduate Scholarship ($1,000)

  • The purpose of this award is to recognize a student who has demonstrated a commitment and passion to global issues in wildlife conservation. Michigan State University and the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife are strongly committed to supporting our students as global citizens. This award will recognize a student who has shown a dedication to issues of global importance in wildlife conservation. Students who have participated in a Study Abroad or other international experiences will be given preference for this award.

Jeffery D. Rupert Leadership Excellence Award ($1,000)

  • This scholarship was established to recognize a Fisheries and Wildlife major who has exhibited extraordinary leadership abilities both in and outside the department; been involved in professional societies as a member of the MSU Fisheries and Wildlife Club and/or a member of the American Fisheries Society or The Wildlife Society; and illustrated scholastic excellence and demonstrates a high potential for success in the fisheries and wildlife field.

Peter I. Tack Undergraduate Scholarship ($1,000)

  • This scholarship was established to provide support and encouragement to undergraduate students in the fisheries and wildlife major who have demonstrated the capacity to achieve educational and professional goals, the motivation to achieve these goals, and the initiative to seek opportunities to further their progress.

Niles R. Kevern Undergraduate Scholarship ($1,000)

  • This scholarship is awarded to a student with a Fisheries and Wildlife major who has demonstrated strong academic achievement, dedication to the mission of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, and the potential to be successful in their profession.

Anglers of the Au Sable Undergraduate Scholarship ($1,000)

  • This scholarship was established to provide support and encouragement to undergraduate students in the fisheries and wildlife major who have demonstrated the capacity to achieve educational and professional goals, the motivation to achieve these goals, and the initiative to seek opportunities to further their progress. This award will recognize a full time senior enrolled in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. Preference will be given to residents of the State of Michigan with demonstrated interest in freshwater fish biology, which best adheres to the principals of the Anglers of the Au Sable (preserve, protect and enhance the Au Sable River System for future generations of fly fishers).

Awards

Fisheries and Wildlife Faculty Outstanding Senior ($2,000)

  • This award goes to the senior in Fisheries and Wildlife who has demonstrated high scholastic achievement and has contributed to the goals of the University, the Department, and to the fisheries and wildlife profession.
  • Students considered for this award are nominated and voted on by the Fisheries and Wildlife faculty.

Fisheries and Wildlife Club Most Active Member

  • This award goes to a Fisheries and Wildlife Club member who has demonstrated a strong commitment to the Club and its activities.
  • Students considered for this award are nominated and voted by members of the Fisheries and Wildlife Club.

Fisheries and Wildlife Club Scholastic Achievement

  • This award goes to the Fisheries and Wildlife Club member with the highest cumulative grade point average.

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Non-MSU Fisheries and Wildlife Related Scholarships

(these scholarships are administered by the listed organization)

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Additional MSU Scholarship Sites

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Clubs

Fisheries & Wildlife Club 

Mission

To further enhance the education and professional development of students interested in natural resources, through hands on experience in management, research, and public outreach, in an engaging community.

Who We Are

We are a student organization which is passionate about conservation and natural resource management. Although our focus is on fish and wildlife management, we are a group with varied interests in the fields of: ecology, conservation biology, marine biology, plant biology, environmental ethics/philosophy, forestry, zoology, wildlife rehabilitation, outdoor education, environmental policy and sustainability. Our members are pursuing careers as naturalists, fish and wildlife biologists, ecologists, researchers, educators and any occupation that focuses on the unique interaction between humans and the environment.

The club is closely connected to our Fisheries and Wildlife Department here at Michigan State University along with being joint Student Chapters of The Wildlife Society and the American Fisheries Society. It is a way for students to further enrich their educational experience outside of class. We provide members with opportunities to gain valuable field experience, meet with professionals, discuss conservation issues and increase the awareness of nature’s benefit to society through outreach on campus. In order to meet the global challenges that threaten our natural world, we understand that we must learn and apply concepts at the local level. At the end of the day though, we are about having fun! Through social gatherings and outdoor recreation, our members become great friends and this is the biggest reason that our organization continues to thrive.

Objectives

To provide an opportunity for students to develop as professionals

To promote educational experiences with hands-on activities

To identify and prevent human induced environmental damage

To communicate to the public issues of major concerns

To promote environmental education in forms of outdoor recreation

To promote high ethical standards for the treatment of the environment


Meetings


The club meets Thursday nights at 6:30 in room 221 in the Natural Resources Building. Anyone can attend meetings and campus events but dues paying members have the opportunity to participate in certain campus events and events at the regional, state and national levels. Dues are $20 for a year and $10 for a semester. We love to see new faces, so come check us out! Explore the rest of our site for more information about the club and sign up for our weekly e-newsletter below.

 

Michigan State University Fishing Club

About Us

We are a part of the Michigan State University Fishing Club.  We were founded in 1997.  We compete every year in the Big Ten Classic on various lakes around the Midwest. In the fall of 2009, we successfully defended our own turf on Lake St. Clair by defeating the rest of the field.  All five of our boats filled out limits of smallmouths, with the top three bags going 49.08 lbs. In 2011 we successfully avenged the Big Ten Championship after falling in 2010. We took the championship on a tough Coldwater Lake in Coldwater, MI.

In 2014 we will begin our six year fishing the FLW College Tour.  We are looking to be successful on our 2014 campaign fishing in Maryland, Virginia, and New York.

We will also be traveling to fish some of the collegiate bass tournaments including the  BASS Under Armor tournament on Guntersville.

We are currently ranked high in the nation in the Boat US standings. We hope to continue our success on this trail on Kentucky Lake later in the year.

Unfortunately, we are only a club sport at the University, which means that we will have to pay our own way to the tournaments.  With that being said we are looking for sponsorship to help us out.  Some of our sponsors we have accumulated include Revolution Baits, The Rod Glove, Nemesis Baits, as well as others.  If you are interested in helping please contact us (.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)).

Follow us on:

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/MSUFishClub

Twitter - @MSU_FishingClub

 

 

Minors

Fisheries and Wildlife Minors:

Other Minors of potential interest:

Looking for more options for minors? Check out all of MSU‘s offerings.

 

Course Requirements

UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS:

Minimum number of credits required: 120 credits
Minimum cumulative grade point average: 2.00

WRITING REQUIREMENT:

Tier I: WRA 110 or higher (4 cr.)
Tier II: Satisfied by completing FW 434 (3 cr.)

INTEGRATIVE STUDIES REQUIREMENT: (24 cr.)

Arts & Humanities (8 cr.)

Complete one IAH course numbered below 211 (4 cr.)
Complete one IAH course numbered 211 or higher (4 cr.).

Social Science (8 cr.)

Complete one 200-level ISS course (4 cr.)
Complete one 300-level ISS course (4 cr.).

Biological & Physical Sciences (8 cr.) [alternative track]
Biological Sciences (3 cr.) - Satisfied by completing BS 161, BS 162, LB 144 or LB 145
Physical Sciences (3 cr.) - Satisfied by completing CEM 141 (4 cr.), CEM 151 (4 cr.) or LB 171 (4 cr.).
Laboratory Experience (2 cr.) - Satisfied by completing (BS 171, BS 172, LB 144 or LB 145 ) and (CEM 161 or LB 171L)

Diversity

Must complete at least two of the three types of diversity designated courses, as part of the IAH and/or ISS requirements listed above.

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES REQUIREMENTS:

Math: satisfied by completing MTH 124 (3 cr.), MTH 132 (3 cr.) or LB 118 (5 cr.).
Economics: Complete EC 201 (3 cr.) OR EC 202 (3 cr.)
CANR Courses: Complete at least 26 credits of CANR courses.  The Conservation Biology, Fisheries Biology and Management, Wildlife Biology and Management, Water Sciences, Fish and Wildlife Disease Ecology and Management and Preveterinary concentrations listed below all require the minimum required CANR credits.  Non-CANR courses substituted for courses in any of the concentrations listed below may require a student to complete additional CANR course credits to meet the College’s 26-credit requirement.

FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE MAJOR REQUIREMENTS:

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (9 to 10 cr.)

Complete ONE of the following groups of courses

(1) BS 161

Cell and Molecular Biology

3

BS 171

Cells and Molecular Biology Lab 

2

BS 162

Organismal & Populations Biology 

3

BS 172

Organismal & Populations Biology Lab 

2

 

(2) LB 144

Biology I – Organismal Biology 

4

BS 161

Cell and Molecular Biology

3

BS 171

Cell and Molecular Biology Lab

2

 

(3) LB 144

Biology I – Organismal Biology                

4

LB 145

Biology II: Cellular & Molecular Biology

5

 

PHYSICAL SCIENCES (8 to 9 cr.)

Complete ONE of the following groups of Chemistry courses

(1) CEM 141 

General Chemistry

4

CEM 161

Chemistry Laboratory I

1

 

(2) CEM 151

General and Descriptive Chemistry

4

CEM 161

Chemistry Laboratory I

1

 

(3) LB 171 

Principles of Chemistry I

4

LB 171L

Introductory Chemistry Lab I

1

 

Complete ONE of the following Physics courses

LB 273         

Physics I

3

PHY 183

Physics for Scientists & Engineers I

4

PHY 231

Introductory Physics I

3

 

EARTH SCIENCE (3 to 4 cr)

Complete ONE of the following Earth Science courses

CSS 210

Fund. of Soils & Landscape Science 

3

ENT 319

 Intro to Earth System Science (HC only)

3

GEO 203

Introduction to Meteorology 

3

GEO 206

Physical Geography

3

GLG 201

The Dynamic Earth

4

 

MATH and STATISTICS (6 to 7 cr.)

Complete ONE of the following Calculus courses

MTH 124

Survey of Calculus I

3

MTH 132

Calculus I                                           

3

LB 118

Calculus I                                           

4

 

Complete ONE of the following Statistics courses

STT 224

Intro to Prob. & Stat for Ecologists

3

STT 231

Statistics for Scientists                   

3

STT 421

Statistics I                                         

3

 

COMMUNICATION (6 cr.)

Complete TWO of the following courses

COM 100

Human Communication

3

COM 225

Intro to Interpersonal Communication 

3

COM 275

Effects of Mass Communcation 

3

FW 435

Integrated Commun. for FW Prof       

3

CSUS 325

Study & Pract. of Comm for Sustainability

3

CSUS 433

Grant Writing & Fund Development (W) 

3

JRN 472

Environmental Reporting Lab

3

WRA 320*

Technical Writing

3

WRA 331*

Writing in the Public Interest  

3

WRA 341

Nature, Environmental & Travel Writing

3

WRA 453*

Grant and Proposal Writing

3

*Contact WRA for an override

 

ETHICS and PHILOSOPHY (3 cr.)

Complete ONE of the following courses

FW 438

Philosophy of Ecology

3

FW 439

Conservation Ethics

3

GEO 432

Environmental Ethics

3

PHL 340

Ethics

3

PHL 342

Environmental Ethics

3

PHL 380

Nature of Science

3

PHL 484

Philosophy of Biological Science

3

 

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING (3 to 4 cr.)

Complete ONE of the following courses

FW 493

Prof. Internship in FW

3

FW 490

Independent Study

3

FW 480

International Studies in FW

3

FW 499

Senior Thesis in FW

4

 

FISHERES & WILDLIFE CORE (19 to 20 cr.)

Complete ONE of the following courses

FW 101 L

Fish & Wildlife Fundamentals Lab

1

FW 238

Intro Fish & Wildlife Field Experience

2-3

 

Complete ALL of the following courses

FW 101

Fish & Wildlife Fundamentals

3

FW 293

Undergrad Seminar in Fish & Wildlife

1

FW 364

Ecological Problem Solving

3

FW 424

Population Analysis and Management

4

FW 434

Human Dimensions of FW Management

3

ZOL 355

Ecology

3

CONCENTRATIONS
Complete ONE of the following six transcriptable concentrations:

(1)  Conservation Biology

(2)  Wildlife Biology and Management

(3)  Fisheries Biology and Management

(4)  Water Sciences

(5)  Fish and Wildlife Disease Ecology and Management

(6)  Preveterinary

 

Education Goals

The mission of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (FW) at Michigan State University (MSU) is to provide the education, research and outreach needed by society for the conservation and rehabilitation of fish and wildlife resources and their ecosystems. Our department seeks to educate students who, upon completion of their undergraduate degree, will be prepared to successfully enter a job market, obtain entry into graduate school and continue to contribute their perspectives, skills and talent to conservation and resource stewardship throughout their lives. Seven goals were developed to provide an operational framework for our Department’s educational mission. These goals provide the foundational structure for our undergraduate curriculum.

 

GOAL 1: Students will be able to apply knowledge of complex socio-ecological systems to develop, implement, and evaluate natural resource management strategies.

Students need to understand how natural resources are imbedded within a complex and interactive physical, biological and social environment, and how these components can be manipulated via management to achieve societal goals. In this context, management should be broadly viewed to include direct manipulations of animal populations, their habitats and human behavior, values and efforts aimed at engaging people about natural resource systems. Although not all of our students will become natural resource managers, they should all have the ability to develop natural resource management strategies following a logical, science-based management process. Thus, if their career path takes them into research, they will have an appreciation for how research supports and enhances natural resource management. Likewise, if their career path takes them into community service, NGO involvement, or non-fisheries and wildlife careers, these students will possess the desire to view natural resource management issues critically and to be involved in activities that effectively address these complexities.

Portions of this goal overlap with goals of allied fields such as zoology and botany that serve as foundational sciences. One of the key differences is that effective resource management requires an understanding of the natural environment, and the legal, social, political, and economic dimensions of ecosystems.

 

GOAL 2: Students will understand the range of social values and philosophies that can be applied to natural resource management and possess a professional perspective that recognizes and integrates this range of philosophies into a science-based approach to management.

Our pluralistic society presents a complex of values and philosophies that can be applied to natural resource management at different levels; often these applications conflict. For example, animal welfare and rights philosophies that are applied to the organismal level often conflict with conservation and even preservation philosophies of population or ecosystem management. The strong traditional role of utilitarian values in the conservation philosophy of our professions often conflicts with preservation philosophy, even though the potential exists to effectively integrate them in many interests. Our students should understand conservationist and preservationist philosophies and be motivated to implement a balanced resource management approach when appropriate. They must be knowledgeable of animal welfare and animal rights philosophies and the difficulties in applying such philosophies to wildlife populations versus individual animals. Students should understand these and other philosophies and accommodate them where they do not interfere with the priority to manage ecological systems.

 

GOAL 3: Students will have broad scientific knowledge from a variety of disciplines necessary to form the foundation for more advanced science-based courses.

In addition to understanding the process of science and the limitations of this process, students require knowledge of scientific “facts” from a variety of disciplines to appreciate integrative aspects covered in more advanced courses. These “core” science classes are also important to provide students with a broad scientific training, allowing them to later pursue more focused areas within fishery and wildlife science.

 

GOAL 4: Students will value science as a basis for problem solving in natural resource management, be able to apply scientific processes and knowledge to professional decision-making, and have a foundation to become an effective contributor to science-based resource knowledge.

Ours is a science-based profession and our undergraduate program must adequately prepare students in the philosophy, findings and processes of science so that they possess the skills and attitude to successfully apply science to their natural resource-related career. Although someone entering the profession with a B.S. degree should be able to make limited contributions to scientific knowledge, a specialized career as a researcher in natural resources will require an advanced degree. Our curriculum, however, must provide students the foundations required for further development of research skills if desired.

 

GOAL 5: Students will be able to think quantitatively and apply quantitative tools to answer natural resource management and research questions.

Research and management in fisheries and wildlife are highly quantitative endeavors. Effective management requires quantitative predictions about the dynamic responses of populations and ecosystems to natural and human-imposed drivers. Effective researchers and managers must think critically and quantitatively about natural resource problems.

 

GOAL 6: Students will be aware of a suite of field, laboratory, and computer-based techniques for studying and managing natural resource systems and will be able to use and apply those techniques appropriate to the student’s specific career interests.

An understanding of complex ecosystems and their management requires proficient use and integration of field, laboratory, and computer-associated techniques. The breadth of the fisheries and wildlife field precludes students from achieving even an introductory level mastery of all the techniques used by natural resource professionals. Students should be familiar with a diversity of techniques used in the fisheries and wildlife fields, and develop proficiency with a subset of those techniques appropriate to their individual interests and future professional plans. Proficiency should include not only an ability to implement these techniques and interpret their findings, but also the ability to identify assumptions, and potential biases or shortcomings associated with specific techniques and their application to particular natural resource management scenarios. Students should also develop attitudes and abilities conducive to remaining current with emerging new techniques with application to novel resource management challenges.

 

GOAL 7: Students will be able to effectively communicate with a diversity of audiences.

Effective, concise and appropriate communication skills (e.g., written and oral, verbal and non-verbal) are extremely important to the natural resource professional. Employers of our students continue to express the need for students to have more and better communication skills. Students majoring in fisheries and wildlife must be able to write effective letters, technical reports, plans, and publications for professional and lay audiences, and be able to convey their work orally to diverse audiences. They must be prepared as communicators who are effective listeners and sensitive to the use of body language. Additional interpersonal communication skills of value in today’s society include the abilities of communicating inter-generationally and cross-culturally. Beyond the technical aspects of speaking and writing, students must have adequate skills in the principles of persuasion, facilitation, conflict management, and other useful communication tools.

Why F&W @ MSU?

NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED PROGRAM

  • USA TODAY’s College Factual recently ranked MSU one of the 10 best colleges for studying natural resources and conservation.
  • The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University is professionally recognized among the top 10 such departments in the nation.
  • There are nearly 50 faculty members in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife with a breadth of expertise and interests in fish and wildlife.
  • Many of our faculty are nationally recognized and considered among the best.
  • More Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries and Wildlife Division employees have graduated from Michigan State University than from any other program.

A LEADER IN ACADEMICS

  • Michigan State University’s fisheries and wildlife program is in the forefront of teaching management, policy, conflict resolution, resource economics, and other aspects of the public dimension, as well as the traditional fish and wildlife biology and ecology.
  • National and internationally recognized scientists visit the department and present seminars regularly.
  • Our friendly faculty are interested in the best education for each student.
  • All of our courses are taught by department faculty.
  • A large diversity of courses allows students to specialize their programs in areas such as aquaculture, aquatic biology, water quality, forestry, resource economics, conservation law enforcement, environmental education, marine ecosystem management, conservation biology, wildlife biology and management.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND OPPORTUNITIES

  • Fisheries and Wildlife Club
  • Fishing Club
  • Students also have the opportunity and are encouraged to attend regional and national professional meetings, such as the Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference or the Annual Conference of the American Fisheries Society or The Wildlife Society, in addition to meetings of the Michigan chapters of the American Fisheries Society and The Wildlife Society.
  • Experiential opportunities are available for undergraduates to work with faculty and graduate students during the school year.

EXCELLENT PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE

  • Fisheries and Wildlife Web-based employment resources
  • Fisheries and Wildlife e-mail job boards keep students informed of current openings
  • National and international alumni networks that identify job openings
  • National reputation of department provides backing for students.
  • Faculty contacts and program reputation help students get into jobs and high-quality graduate programs throughout the nation.

MORE THAN 100 GRADUATE STUDENT AND FACULTY RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • State, regional, national and international research projects and opportunities.

    Examples of some of our current projects
    • Community Participation in Natural Resources Management in Malawi (Africa)
    • Moose Population Assessment in Michigan
    • Eastern Massasauga Rattlesnakes in Southwestern Lower Michigan
    • Great Lakes Sea Lamprey Populations
    • Classification of Panda Habitats (China)
    • Macroinvertebrate Fauna of SE Alaskan Streams
    • Water Quality and Public Health Risk in the Great Lakes
  • Research projects provide employment and experience opportunities for our undergraduates.
  • Provides real life, modern examples for course interaction.
  • Field research stations throughout Michigan (Ludington and Dunbar on the Great Lakes; Kellogg Biological Station; WaWaSum on the AuSable River; Pigeon River elk area; Rose Lake Game Area; and Lake City pond facility).

INTERNATIONAL DIMENSION

  • Graduate students from many nations provide exposure for U.S. students and add a global dimension.
  • Our faculty have visited more than 20 other nations and have contacts and interactions with scientists in those countries.
  • Our department and faculty are leaders in developing study abroad courses.  We currently have opportunities to study fisheries or wildlife in such places as Antarctica, Egypt, Fiji, Madagascar, the Mediterranean, Nicaraqua, and South Africa.

Fisheries and wildlife is likely the right major for you, if you say things like ...

  • I’m interested in the environment
  • I’m interested in sustainability; or sustainable management
  • I want to work outside
  • I like to fish; I like to hunt
  • I want to protect tigers, wolves, grizzlies, etc.
  • I want to be a wildlife biologist; I want to be a fisheries biologist
  • I want to work for the Department of Natural Resources (DNR)
  • I want to work for the Fish and Wildlife Service, or the National Park Service
  • I’m interested in conservation biology
  • I want to work with endangered species
  • I’m interested in marine biology
  • I’m interested in working with wetlands and waterfowl
  • I want to be a conservation officer, or a game warden
  • I’m interested in environmental education
  • I want to work at a nature center
  • I’m interested in wildlife rehabilitation


INTERESTED IN SUSTAINABILITY?

  • “Environmental Sustainability” seems to be the popular trend right now, but sustainability is nothing new to the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
  • We’ve been addressing the sustainable needs of our natural resources since the department was formed in 1950
  • The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife strives to meet the global challenges that threaten the sustainability of our ecosystems.
  • The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife has been researching, teaching, and outreaching effective management tools and methods that address the ecological sustainability of our fish and wildlife populations, and have been doing so long before “sustainability” became popular.


If you would like more information about the Fisheries and Wildlife program at Michigan State University, please call our Academic Advising Center at 517-353-9091, e-mail us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or write us at Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Natural Resources Building, 480 Wilson Road, Room 40, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1222.

Mission and Vision

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife was established in 1950 with faculty drawn from several different units. Since that time both the faculty and the issues of import in fisheries and wildlife have changed significantly. Building on past successes while simultaneously preparing for future change in societal needs requires the development of a forward-looking plan of operation. The following plan should allow the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife to evaluate opportunities for growth relative to the needs of society in a reasoned manner.

Mission Statement:

Our mission is to provide the education, research, and outreach needed by society for the conservation and rehabilitation of fish and wildlife resources and their ecosystems.

Vision Statement:

The vision of the department is to cooperatively develop sufficient understanding of the structure and function of ecosystems to allow reasoned conservation, rehabilitation and management of fisheries and wildlife resources.

Values:

  • We value the land grant mission that seeks to provide -
    1. citizen access to higher education regardless of wealth or social status
    2. excellent instruction in the knowledge and capabilities needed by students for the professions and careers important to society, and
    3. a strengthened democratic system and citizenry through programs of education, research, and outreach/extension. Our first obligation in realizing the land grant mission is to serve the people of Michigan.
  • We value our responsibility for natural resource stewardship through the development of methods of sustainable use and maintenance of ecological integrity.
  • We value fairness in access to publicly owned resources to accommodate a full range of use.
  • We value equally teaching, research, and outreach/extension activities. We recognize that effective integration of these functions is essential for providing high quality, relevant programs, both domestic and international.
  • We value the entire continuum of disciplinary, subject matter, and problem-solving knowledge, all of which are essential for the success of the department, college, and university missions.
  • We value involvement in international teaching, research, and outreach programs. These activities inform our domestic efforts and enable us to address important problems and opportunities in Michigan’s agriculture and natural resource sectors.
  • We value academic freedom and its responsible exercise.
  • We value intellectual diversity and heterogeneity in faculty composition.
  • We value collaborative and individual efforts. We recognize the increasing importance of collaborative efforts to seek solutions to society’s needs and problems.
  • We value a supportive work environment that recognizes that faculty and staff have commitments outside of their professional lives.

Strategic Plan

Strategic Plan

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife was established in 1950 with faculty drawn from several different units. Since that time both the faculty and the issues of import in fisheries and wildlife have changed significantly. Building on past successes while simultaneously preparing for future change in societal needs requires the development of a forward-looking plan of operation. The following plan should allow the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife to evaluate opportunities for growth relative to the needs of society in a reasoned manner.

Issue Statements and Strategic Goals: TEACHING

 

Issue: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife must maintain and enhance the quality of the teaching program to maintain our position as a leading department in the country.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Adopt a policy and develop a process for evaluation of individual courses in the context of Departmental goals and the overall curriculum.
  • Strategic Goal 2: Offer a sufficient number of service and major (program-related) courses to meet college and departmental requirements and expectations of majors and non-majors while maintaining well rounded curriculum for majors.
  • Strategic Goal 3: Develop and implement a process to evaluate curricular changes.
  • Strategic Goal 4: Develop and implement a procedure for periodic review and revision of the experiential learning opportunities offered both in class and in extra-curricular activities.
  • Strategic Goal 5: Enhance and maintain the highest quality of teaching among our faculty, including the implementation of innovative, effective technology in our teaching program and the continued development of faculty teaching abilities.
  • Strategic Goal 6: Develop a plan for updating and maintaining teaching equipment which includes a system for annual review of these needs and a process for recommending budget items to the Department Chair.
  • Strategic Goal 7: Develop and implement a set of procedures which ensures that Ph.D. candidates interested in academic careers in higher education will develop specified competencies for teaching university level classes.
  • Strategic Goal 8: Enhance and maintain the highest quality of undergraduate and graduate student advising among our faculty, including the use of innovative, effective technology to better match advising with the curriculum and other experiences.

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Issue Statements and Strategic Goals: RESEARCH

 

Issue: the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife must address the fact that our research infrastructure and organization is designed for independent workers and not to achieve the collaboration required to maximize meaningful contributions to resource management problem-solving.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Encourage collaborative research.

 

Issue: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife must address the failure to effectively communicate short- and long-term research directions, issues, and findings within the department.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Enhance communication of short- and long-term research directions, issues and findings within the department.

 

Issue: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife must address the fact that the source of resources to support research within the department, whether it be federal, state, university, private sector, or other, changes over time, and sometimes quite rapidly.

  • Strategic Goal 1: maintain up-to-date information resources on research funding opportunities

 

Issue: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife must address the opportunity to enhance research productivity by more effectively utilizing non-faculty researchers (post-docs, students) in a broader variety of research activities.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Increase the participation of undergraduate and graduate students, specialists, research associates, and postdoctoral associates in a broad variety of research activities.

 

Issue: the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife must address the need to enhance landscape/ecosystem-based research.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Enhance landscape/ecosystem-based research.

 

Issue: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife must provide resources for initiating new research efforts.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Build funding mechanisms for seeding new research activities.

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Issue Statements and Strategic Goals: OUTREACH

 

Issue: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife must address the fact that the department does not have a well-defined outreach program at the department level. Rather, outreach occurs by individuals to greater or lesser extents, and with greater or lesser amounts of actual program planning for outreach.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Develop and use a department-wide program of planning, delivery and evaluation of outreach activities

 

Issue: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife must develop a systematic and dynamic process of identifying clientele groups, determining their needs that can be met by the department, and setting priorities for which groups and needs we will seek to meet.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Assess the outreach needs of FW Department clientele.

 

Issue: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife must develop agreement and common understanding among faculty that all faculty have outreach, service, and extension responsibilities.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Develop clear statements of outreach roles for faculty, staff and students.

 

Issue: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife must achieve a balance between priority needs for our outreach services and the resources (staff, faculty, and funds) that are available for meeting the needs.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Optimize program delivery within the constraints of departmental resources and seek new resources for high priority program needs.

 

Issue: The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife will incorporate a landscape and ecosystem approach to management in its interactions with various outreach clientele groups.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Promote outreach programs on landscape and ecosystem approaches to management.

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Issue Statements and Strategic Goals: INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION

 

Issue: The department must foster and maintain quality relations with alumni.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Develop and implement a set of procedures to communicate effectively with our alumni and obtain alumni support for departmental programs.
  • Strategic Goal 2: Develop and implement a set of procedures to enhance appropriate placement of our graduates in professional fields and track their professional activities.

 

Issue: The department must maintain high standards of conduct and operation in accordance with the rules of academic governance.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Develop and implement a set of procedures to formulate and/or codify and regularly review all documents required for the academic governance of the department.

 

Issue: The department must ensure effective and clear communications at all levels within the department.

  • Strategic Goal 1: To develop an effective communication system within the department between faculty, staff and students.

 

Issue: The department must have the resources necessary to carry-out its mission.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Develop and implement a set of procedures to ensure that the resources necessary to carry out the department’s mission are identified and prioritized.

 

Issue: The department must assure the consistent recruitment of quality graduate students.

  • Strategic Goal 1: Implement a process which will assure that high quality graduate students are consistently recruited into the department’s graduate program.

 

Issue: The department must establish a process to identify emerging trends and needs in fisheries and wildlife.

  • Strategic Goal 1: The advisory committee in consultation with the faculty will establish a process for biennial review of trends and needs in fisheries and wildlife to identify present and future needs and opportunities for the department.

 

Issue: The department must establish a process for evaluating the benefits and costs of opportunities for growth.

  • Strategic Goal 1: The advisory committee in consultation with the faculty will establish a process for developing an impact statement for each growth opportunity to include considerations of faculty, space, undergraduate and graduate education and other resources.

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Research

Our faculty are very diverse and are engaged in a wide range of different themes related to our mission of providing the research needed by society for the conservation and rehabilitation of fish, wildlife and water resources and their ecosystems. Many of our faculty work within several of these theme areas and so the research areas are not mutually exclusive. Click on the themes to the right to see the list of faculty working in each area.

Alumni

Welcome back FW alums!

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife strongly supports Michigan State University’s guiding principle to improve access to quality education and expert knowledge. If you are interested in supporting the department by donating to one of our endowments, please check out our endowments page. You can also learn more about giving to Michigan State University through its Campaign for MSU.

 

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Alumni Relations

MSU Alumni Relations

Fisheries and Wildlife Spotlight

 

Contact Us

Michigan State University
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road, Room 13
East Lansing, Michigan 48824

Tel: 517.355.4478
Fax: 517.432.1699
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Map and driving directions to Fisheries and Wildlife. *Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to read PDF documents.

 

 

Partners & Outreach

Partners

Partnership for Ecosystem Research and Management (PERM)
The Partnership for Ecosystem Research and Management (PERM) began as a formal partnership between Michigan State University and the Fisheries and Wildlife divisions of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR). This partnership was established on Earth Day, April 22, 1993 to enhance the ability of the university and MDNR to work with other stakeholders toward identifying significant ecosystem problems and conducting research toward their solution.

Boone and Crockett Club
The Boone and Crockett Club—Michigan State University partnership, in collaboration with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, will be the catalyst to bridge the science-policy interface and provide leadership for the conservation of our nation’s wildlife resources, their habitats, and the benefits they provide to society.

MSU AgBioResearch
MSU AgBioResearch encompasses the work of more than 300 scientists in seven colleges at MSU: Agriculture and Natural Resources, Arts and Letters, Communication Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Natural Science, Social Science and Veterinary Medicine

Michigan Sea Grant
Michigan Sea Grant is a joint program of University of Michigan and Michigan State University. It is part of the National Sea Grant College Program, a network of 30 university-based programs in coastal states across the country.

MSU Extension
Since its beginning, Michigan Extension has focused on bringing knowledge-based educational programs to the people of the state to improve their lives and communities. Today, county-based staff members, in concert with on-campus faculty members, serve every county with programming focused on agriculture and natural resources; children, youth and families; and community and economic development.

Undergraduate Program

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Imagine yourself studying fish populations on the shores of a remote lake in Oregon, investigating wild turkeys in Missouri, examining elk here in Michigan, or teaching the secrets of our country’s national parks and forests to eager, excited children. Or perhaps, you’re interested in pollution and environmental implications, public health, or environmental policy. A degree in fisheries and wildlife from Michigan State University can prepare you for these and many other rewarding careers.

Students majoring in fisheries and wildlife typically prepare for professional careers as fisheries and wildlife managers, biologists, naturalists and applied ecologists. However, graduates may also pursue related career opportunities as conservation officers, environmental consultants or administrators with federal, state and private agencies and organizations concerned with environmental management. Whether you’re more comfortable working in a busy office or out in the wilderness, there’s a place for you in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife.

About Fisheries and Wildlife

Welcome to the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at Michigan State University where we conduct cutting-edge research and present the highest quality instruction possible to our students. We are devoted to providing leadership and remain connected with our many stakeholders.

Natural resource and ecosystem management is our business, and we invite you to join us-you won’t be disappointed. Our faculty and staff are highly energized folks who are impassioned about their work. Over the last 13 years, our department has grown significantly. Some 50 strong, we are dedicated individuals, intent on preserving our past and creating our future.

So, please take your time exploring our site…there’s much to see. After your virtual visit, please call or stop by to feel the energy first-hand.  We can’t wait to share our excitement.

Along with the entire Michigan State University, we are committed to advancing knowledge and transforming lives.

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Fisheries and Wildlife Department Office

Scott Winterstein, Professor and Chairperson

Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road, Room 007
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-0647; Fax: (517) 432-1699
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Sharon Reasoner, Administrative Assistant to the Chair
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Bylaws

Adunct Faculty Procedures

Graduate Handbook

Standard Operating Procedures

Graduate Program

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife offers a doctoral (Ph.D.) degree and thesis and non-thesis options for Master of Science degrees in Fisheries and Wildlife. Formal interdepartmental specializations and dual degrees are available through the department’s participation in environmental toxicology; resource economics; and ecology, evolutionary biology and behavior programs. The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources has a strong biometry group.

The department’s graduate program is a national leader in the training of fishery and wildlife professionals for careers in research, management, teaching, extension and consulting. Graduates of our master’s program are hired by a variety of local, state and federal governmental agencies; private corporations; museums; zoos and nature centers; tribal organizations; and environmental consulting firms. Ph.D. graduates are employed on the faculty of leading universities and compete successfully for positions outside of academia. More than 60 graduate students are currently enrolled, and the majority of these students receive financial assistance in the form of graduate assistantships.

Graduate student research projects encompass diverse areas of limnology, fisheries and wildlife, including human dimensions aspects. These projects take advantage of modern computing facilities, a world-class library, university research stations, and the tremendous natural resources of Michigan. Graduate students are also involved in projects of national and international scope and present research results to a wide range of regional, national and international audiences.

Handbook

Safety Manual

Apply to the Graduate School

 

Seminars

Directory

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People making a difference… faculty and staff in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife assist in the preparation of students for professional careers in fisheries and wildlife as biologists, managers, consultants and administrators. Many faculty are involved in graduate and undergraduate curriculum in either a fishery science or a wildlife science major. In addition to instruction, faculty have strong research projects that cover a wide range of subject matter.

Fisheries and Wildlife Department Office

Scott Winterstein, Chairperson

Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road, Room 007
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-0647; Fax: (517) 432-1699
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Sharon Reasoner, Administrative Assistant to the Chair
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Undergraduate Degree Program

Jim Schneider, Undergraduate Program Coordinator/Adviser
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
ADVISING - To schedule an appointment with Jim Schneider, contact the Academic Advising Center or use the Online Adviser Scheduling System.

Academic Advising Center
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road, Room 40
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-9091; Fax: (517) 432-7949

Jill Cruth, Undergraduate Secretary
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Graduate Degree Programs (M.S. and Ph.D)

Shawn Riley, Graduate Program Committee Chair
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Graduate Studies Office
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
Natural Resources Building
480 Wilson Road, Room 40
East Lansing, MI 48824
Phone: (517) 353-9091; Fax: (517) 432-7949

Jill Cruth, Graduate Secretary
E-mail: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Map and driving directions to Fisheries and Wildlife. *Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to read PDF documents.

In the News

Home

WELCOME to the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University.  We strongly believe that our natural resources and environment are vital to our future, thus the faculty, staff and students in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife strive to meet the global challenges that threaten the sustainability of our ecosystems. We empower our students and our stakeholders with the knowledge needed to ensure our natural heritage and a high quality of life. We accomplish this through our renowned and distinguished education, research and outreach programs.

The Department of Fisheries and Wildlife has been serving the needs of MSU,
Michigan, the U.S. and the globe for the past 65 years!

Watch what we do…

Who will make a difference for the rivers, the lakes, the land?
For the fish, the wildlife, the environment?
WE WILL!

Become a part of making this difference.
Become a part of our Fisheries and Wildlife family today!